Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

Please keep in mind that not all courses will be available during each semester. Check the current Semester Schedule of your campus to see what courses will be available.

 

ACCOUNTING

ACG-101 (3 Credits)
Accounting Principles I
This is an introductory course in the theory and practice of accounting that covers the purpose of accounting, the accounting process, and the various types of ownership structure. Also covered are types of business, career opportunities in accounting, analyzing financial transactions, adjusting entries, accounting worksheets, financial statements, and the closing process. Computerized exercise problems are used to assist student understanding and proficiency. This course is only offered for fall enrollment.


ACG-111 (3 Credits)
Accounting Principles II
This course is a continuation of theory and practice of accounting study began in ACG-101. Specialized accounting procedures for a service business and its environment, entrepreneurship, and small businesses are emphasized. Topics covered include the modified cash basis and combination journal, accounting for cash, payroll accounting, employee earnings and deductions, payroll accounting, employer taxes, and reports.

Prerequisite: ACG-101 (Accounting Principles I)


ACG-112 (3 Credits)
Income Tax I
This is a practical approach to the income tax system involving preparation of individual tax returns using forms 1040EZ, 1040-A, and 1040. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of tax regulations/laws, tax schedules, worksheets and forms, and includes discussion of dependents, exemptions and allowable credits. The course is offered in the spring semester only.


ACG-113 (3 Credits)
Accounting Applications
This course uses practice sets and hypothetical businesses in the three basic forms of business—sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation—in order to stress the appropriate accounting applications for each type of business. The latest accounting software is used as well as workshops and seminars.

Prerequisites: ACG 111 (Accounting Principles II) and any computer course


ACG-114 (3 Credits)
Spreadsheet Accounting I
This is a tutorial and applications course using the Microsoft Excel software. This course is intended to reinforce accounting through the use of Excel spreadsheets. It is primarily a self-tutorial course that, in conjunction with Accounting I and II, teaches students how to produce graphs to support financial statements and other worksheets.


ACG-201 (3 Credits)
Payroll Accounting
This course is designed to develop a well-rounded understanding of the payroll system used by all employers. The course concerns itself with all federal and state tax requirements, reporting forms such as the federal 940 and 941, depository requirements, and employee records resulting in a W-2 (Wage & Earning Statement).

Prerequisite: Third-semester accounting or public administration students only.


ACG-204 (3 Credits)
Advanced Accounting I
A continuation of Accounting Principles II (ACG-111), this course focuses on specialized accounting procedures for merchandising business and partnerships, accounts receivable, notes and interest, merchandise inventory, and long term assets.

Prerequisite: ACG-111 (Accounting Principles II)


ACG-210 (3 Credits)
Principles of Management
This is an introductory management course that will motivate student develop a basic understanding of management, its practices and techniques. It will also focus on the theory and fundamental concepts of management including planning, organization, leadership and control. Student will also be familiar with different ideas and terminologies that will be helpful in many managerial situations for the class will review the evolution of management thought, function and practice, will stress present approaches and developing concept by means of emphasizing different cases of management.


ACG-211 (3 Credits)
Accounting Software Applications
This course is intended to reinforce accounting concepts through the use of integrated computerized accounting software. It provides a self-paced, step-by-step environment in which students use it to create financial statements and other financial reports to strengthen the ideas they learn in their first year accounting courses and see how computer software can be used to make business decisions. It covers single proprietorship, partnership and corporations and whether it’s a general business, manufacturing, consulting, product-base, service-based, contractor, wholesale/distribution, engineering, non-profit, retail, and professional services type of business.

Prerequisite: ACG-114 (Spreadsheet Accounting I)


ACG-212 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Finance
This an introductory finance course designed to make students understand the basic finance concepts. This course includes studies on firm's financial goals and decisions to maximize shareholders' wealth. The course stresses the understanding of finance theory and working knowledge of the financial environment in which the firm operates in order to develop appropriate financial strategies. It examines financial concepts and analytical techniques, financial performance, time value of money, measurement of risk and return, capital budgeting, capital structure, short-term financial planning, working capital management, and international finance.


ACG-213 (3 Credits)
Introductions to Fund Accounting
As an overview of not-for-profit organizations (organizations exempt from the payment of taxes), this course covers the role of management, financial analysis, the current status of financial accounting and managerial control in not-for-profit organizations, budgetary analysis and controls, and budget preparations.


ACG-214 (3 Credits)
Advanced Accounting
This course is a continuation of Advanced Accounting I (ACG-204) and covers accounting for corporations and manufacturing businesses, organization and capital stock, earnings and distribution bonds, the statement of cash flow, the indirect method, analysis of financial statements, departmental accounting, the job order cost system, and the worksheet and financial statement.

Prerequisite: ACG-204 (Advanced Accounting I)


ACG-215 (3 Credits)
Income Tax II
This is a second year continuation of income tax preparation covered in Income Tax I (ACG-112). The course includes updating of new tax laws and regulations and practical tax preparation in the areas of corporations, partnerships, and not-for-profit organizations.

Prerequisite: ACG-112 (Income Tax I)


ACG-216 (3 Credits)
Principles of Marketing
An introductory course in marketing which covers the evolution of modern management toward a marketing-oriented view of business; emphasizing the fundamental principles of the “marketing concept”; and integrating concepts in relation to consumer needs, marketing information, product development, pricing, distribution, selling, advertising and promotion.


ACG-220 (3 Credits)
Cost Accounting
This course covers an analysis of cost data for goods and services for planning, controlling, and decision-making. Study of cost accounting emphasizes the concept of different costs for different purposes. The focus of study will be on cost accounting strategy and decision making process. It includes cost concepts and behavior, cost-volume-profit (break-even) analysis, Relevant costs for decision making, cost estimation, job costing, activity-based costing, cost allocation, budgeting and variance analysis.


ACG-225 (3 Credits)
Managerial Accounting
This is an introductory course that stresses accounting concepts and procedures related to generating and using accounting information for planning, control, and decision-making of business operations. Student will learn alternative methods of preparing managerial accounting information and examining how these methods are used by different companies to maximize economic profit.


ACG-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Accounting
These courses cover a variety of topics surrounding the emerging applications and technologies in the areas of bookkeeping and accounting. Different section numbers indicate different topics so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. These courses are offered according to need, interest, and demand.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE SPECIALIST

ADM-101 (3 Credits)
Keyboarding & Formatting I
Keyboarding competence is the goal of the course. This course will use state-of-the-art word-processing software to learn to prepare letters, memos, reports, and other computer-based documents used in today’s automated office environment.


ADM-105 (3 Credits)
MS Excel Applications
This is a hands-on course in using Microsoft Excel. Various aspects of spreadsheet applications will be covered.

Prerequisite: ADM-101 (Keyboard & Formatting I)


ADM-111 (3 Credits)
Keyboarding & Formatting II
Improved keyboarding competence is the goal of this course. Emphasis is placed on production of mail-able business letters, manuscripts, tables, business forms, and other correspondence on state-of-the-art equipment.

Prerequisite: ADM-101 (Keyboarding & Formatting I


ADM-113 (3 Credits)
Office Procedures
Students will use supplemental materials to complete coursework in time management and stress reduction. The Office Procedures course will stress the following: the high-tech workplace, success behaviors, work ethics, diversity, office communications, meetings, conferences and travel.


ADM-114 (3 Credits)
Business Mathematics and Calculators
This course will introduce the student to working with the computer and 10-key calculator to do mathematical business processes using various formulas. Using the reach process, students will achieve speed and accuracy.

Prerequisite: Must be a second semester student before enrolling in this course or have permission from the instructor


ADM-115 (3 Credits)
Records Management
The students will apply rules for alphabetic, numeric, geographic, topical, and chronological filing by using individual names, business names, school government units, and other common organizational units in storing and retrieving documents. Computer applications will be introduced.


ADM-201 (3 Credits)
Advanced Document Formatting
Keyboarding competence on state-of-the-art equipment is the goal. Students produce business letters using different sized letterheads, technical reports, graphic aids, and IRS and FICA forms. Creation of legal and medical forms will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: ADM-111 (Keyboarding & Formatting II


ADM-202 (3 Credits)
Office Communication
The purpose of this course is to develop professional oral and written proficiency that will lead to career success. Students will develop an awareness of the complexity of the communication process through writing clear, concise business documents. They will learn to manage the mail and various means of transporting documents from one location to another. In addition, they will learn telephone skills and business etiquette, and learn to communicate interpersonally as well as in a group.


ADM-203 (3 Credits)
Advertising & Public Relations Strategies
This course will provide students with the knowledge of how to present a business to the public and will teach students about the tools available that will give business documents/publications a polished and professional appearance. Students will produce their own business cards and brochures, write a newsletter, and produce a publication that profiles the students at Navajo Technical University. These projects will create an understanding of the importance and usefulness of marketing as a strategy in the marketplace.


ADM-204 (3 Credits)
Machine Transcription
This course will introduce the concept of document processing by means of receiving dictation from a recording device. Transcribing, formatting, proof-reading, creating, editing, and printing are skills taught in the class.


ADM-205 (3 Credits)
Office Management
Students will be presented with an overview of the Total Quality Management Process. They will learn team building and their role as administrative assistants within a team. Students will be introduced to a process-focused approach of achieving continuous, measurable improvement in the workplace through the use of the Navajo Nation Foundation of Education and the Shewhart Cycle used in the Total Quality Management Training. Finally, students will look at office design and its importance to the flow of work and production within the office environment.

Prerequisite: ADM-113 (Office Procedure)


ADM-208 (3 Credits)
Office Accounting
This course covers cash accounting including financial statements, trial balance, balance sheets, and income statements. Its focus is on sole proprietorship.


ADM-210 (3 Credits)
MS PowerPoint Presentation Skills
This course will offer the opportunity for the student to combine technology with public speaking skills for use in the business environment. Presentation Skills concentrates on oral communication and integration of computer technology into public presentations. Students will also learn about effective listening, group decision-making, and the impact of culture on communication. Culmination of the semester’s work will be a presentation made using PowerPoint software.

Prerequisite: ADM-101 (Keyboarding & Formatting I)


ADM-213 (3 Credits)
Internship
In the internship portion of this program, students will work a minimum of 150 hours at office-related, supervised worksites. The student trainee is paid by the cooperating firm and supervised jointly by NTU and the employer. Office practice procedures will be composed of several practice simulations such as receptionist, records clerk, secretary, and administrative assistant.


ADM-195/295 (1-3 Credits
Topics in Administrative Office Specialist
Topics courses will address a variety of subjects in emerging areas of administrative professional skill development. Different section numbers indicate different topics so these courses may be repeated for credit if section numbers are different. Courses are offered according to need, interest, and demand.

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

AMT-210 (3 Credits)
Applied GD&T
This course will provide in-depth understanding of all the essential principles underling the Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing methodology, as set forth in ASME Y14.5.2-1995. Adherence to this standard has been shown to provide the highest level of built-in quality of manufactured artifacts. The course will include lectures on GD&T theory and practicum inspection lab exercises to reinforce the theory lectures.


AMT-311 (3 Credits)
Laser Scanning Methods/Technologies
Students will learn the basics of laser scanning for digital manufacturing and inspection. Medium to long range scanners and close range high quality scanners will be used in the course. Students will gain hands-on experience in capturing digital data, registering scans and processing scans.


AMT-322 (3 Credits)
Structure & Property of Materials
The students will learn behavior of different engineering material under various conditions. Chemical, electrical, and mechanical properties of material will be investigated.

Prerequisite: PHY-101 (Introduction to Physics)


AMT-325 (3 Credits)
Digital Inspection/Quality Control
This course covers digital inspection utilizing computer-aided verification. Geometric dimensioning and tolerance control and basic size inspection will also be covered along with surface inspection and the basics of quality control.


AMT-370 (3 Credits)
Robotics/Offline Programming
This course will cover the basics of industrial robotics and how to develop offline programming through simulations. Applications of robots, programming of robots, robot axes and kinematics will be explored.


AMT-401 (4 Credits)
Capstone
The capstone course will provide the students an opportunity to utilize the skills gained from the previous semesters. Students will begin a semester project containing several elements of industrial engineering and manufacturing, including project management, 3-D modeling, and computer simulation. The will contain the research and planning of the project along with a project proposal complete with deliverables. Students will provide a project report, a final presentation and deliverables agreed upon in the project proposal.


AMT-412 (3 Credits)
Advanced Digital Inspection
Course will provide both theoretical and practical concepts of combining digital information from an entire suite of manufacturing systems such as CAD design programs, CNC machine tools, laser and structured light scanners, CCD cameras, CMM and Touch probe systems with the goal of establishing a seamless once-though manufacturing process with dependable precision.


AMT-415 (3 Credits)
Simulation of Manufacturing Systems
The objectives of this course are to provide the students with a strong working knowledge of computer aided methods of integrated manufacturing systems and computer simulation of individual sub-systems such as CNC machine tools in addition to high level integrated simulation of the complete production plant.


AMT-430 (3 Credits)
PLC Programming
An introductory to Programmable Logic Controls (PLC), focusing on the underlying principles and requirements of discrete event control methods (Boolean logic) as a basis for understanding how PLCs work. The course will also provide practical information and skills about installing, programming, and troubleshooting a PLC system.

ART

ART-110 (3 Credits)
Art Studio I
This course is designed to introduce students to various concepts and techniques of drawing. We will begin by looking at forms, problem solving, and then gradually learn different ways of seeing through artistic eyes. By working with topics and subject matter that are Diné centered, we will be creating projects that are conducive to our lives and homes. Finally, the course will end with a gallery showing of our work.


ART-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Art
These topics courses are designed to explore contemporary or emerging trends in the art discipline. Content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. These courses are offered according to interest, need, and demand.

ASTRONOMY

AST-110 (4 Credits)
The Solar System
This course is designed to survey the subject of solar system astronomy at the introductory level. We begin our journey with a brief history of astronomy with a focus on its role in Diné culture, and the study of cyclical motions of the objects we see in our sky. We will develop the physical principles needed to understand gravity and electromagnetic radiation (light) as we step our way through the planets and other objects in our solar system. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00


AST-112 (4 Credits)
The Cosmic System
This course is designed to survey the subject of galactic astronomy at the introductory level. We begin our journey with a brief history of astronomy with a focus on its role in Diné culture, and study the cyclical motions of the objects we see in our sky. We will develop the physical principles needed to understand gravity and electromagnetic radiation (light) as we step our way through our galaxy and into the universe as a whole. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

AUT-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Automotive Technology This course covers opportunities for employment, automotive technician responsibilities, and an overall view of the modern day automobile industry. Shop safety, tools, shop equipment, repair parts, and other accessories are topics covered in this course. The operation of a gasoline engine, various procedures for diagnostic analysis, and the repair of those engines will be performed.


AUT-102 (4 Credits)
Brake Systems
The theory, diagnosis, and repair of disc and drum brakes is covered in this course. Mechanical and hydraulic theory and principles will be addressed, as well as brake resurfacing, precision measuring, overhauling, bleeding, and adjusting. Anti-lock brake system theory, diagnosis, repair, and scanning will also be learned.


AUT-103 (4 Credits)
Electrical and Electronic Systems
This course teaches electrical theory, diagnosis, and repair as it pertains to automotive applications. Starting and charging systems, batteries, body electrical systems, engine compartment electrical systems, and accessories are some of the topics that will be covered.


AUT-104 (4 Credits)
Chassis, Suspension, and Steering
This course teaches wheel alignment theory, diagnosis, and repair for both front- and rear- wheel drive vehicles. Some of the topics covered include suspension systems, tire and wheel analysis, shocks and struts, bushings, and manual and power steering components.


AUT-111 (4 Credits)
Drivetrains and Axels
This course will cover the theory, diagnosis, and repair of various drive train components on front and rear wheel drive vehicles. Systems that include U-joints, C/V joints, drive lines, flywheels, clutches, manual transmissions, transaxles, differential ring and pinion, axles, and yokes are explained. Seals, bearings, and fluids are additional topics that will be taught.


AUT-113 (4 Credits)
Tune-Up/Engine Performance
This course will cover conventional and electronic gasoline engine tune-up procedures. Topics will include engine mechanics, fuel systems, ignition systems, and computer systems. Modern engine control system diagnostics and repair procedures pertinent to today’s automobile will also be covered.

Prerequisite: AUT-103 (Electrical and Electronic Systems


AUT-114 (4 Credits)
Automatic Transmission and Transaxle Overhaul
This course is a study of the operation, hydraulic principles, and related circuits of modern automatic transmission and transaxles. Topics include diagnosis, disassembly, and assembly procedures with emphasis on the use of special tools and proper repair techniques.


AUT-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Automotive Technology
These topics courses are designed to explore contemporary or emerging technologies in the automotive technology field. Content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. These courses are offered according to interest, need, and demand.


AUT-203 (4 Credits)
Advanced Electrical and Electronics Systems
This course is a continuation of AUT-103 and teaches advanced electrical theory, diagnosis, and repair. The course also offers more in-depth study of starting systems, charging systems, batteries, body electrical systems, engine compartment electrical systems, and accessories.

Prerequisite: AUT-103 (Electrical and Electronic Systems) or permission of the instructor


AUT-212 (3 Credits)
Heating/Air-Conditioning Systems
This course covers the theory, diagnosis, and repair of heating and air conditioning systems as they pertain to the automobile. Compressors, hoses, receiver driers, evaporators, condensers, expansion devices, heater cores, water pumps, thermostats, core plugs, fans, and belts are some of the components that will be covered. National standards for the safe and environmentally correct use of refrigerants will also be emphasized.


AUT-213 (4 Credits)
Advanced Engine Performance
This course covers diagnostic procedures pertinent to today’s automobile. Some of the topics of instruction will include wiring diagrams, sensor diagnostics, check engine light diagnostics, engine analyzer diagnostics, scan tool diagnostics, electrical meter diagnostics, and other forms of modern automotive diagnostics.

Prerequisite: AUT-113 (Tune-Up/Engine Performance) or permission of the instructor


AUT-215 (4 Credits)
Engine Repair
This course teaches the theory and repair of all types of automotive engines and engine-related components. Engine blocks, intake and exhaust manifolds, cylinder heads, valve trains, pistons, connecting rods, and crank shafts are some of the topics that will be covered. Precision measurement, shop safety and good working habits will also be introduced to the student throughout the course.


AUT-285 (3 Credits)
Practicum in Automotive Technology I
This course will consist of Hands-on assignments here at the Navajo Technical University Automotive Shop.


AUT-286 (3 Credits)
Practicum in Automotive Technology II
This course will consist of Hands-on assignments here at the Navajo Technical University Automotive Shop.

BIOLOGY

BIO-110 (4 Credits)
Elements of Biology
This is a Biology course for non-Biology majors. Biological principles important for the non-scientist in today’s world including ecological, nutritional, human anatomy, evolutionary, and molecular topics will be covered. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00


BIO-120 (4 Credits)
Principles of Biology I
Topics covered in this course include impact biology, biological chemistry, molecular genetics, Mendelian inheritance, and embryology. The emphasis of the course is placed on development concepts. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00


BIO-122 (4 Credits)
Principles of Biology II
As a continuum of BIO-120, this course focuses on population genetics, evolution, ecology, behavior, plant and animal physiology, and survey of diversity of organisms. An introduction to microbiology with emphasis on principles of infection and immunity is also part of the course. Lab included.

Prerequisite: BIO-120 (Principles of Biology I)
Lab fee: $125.00


BIO-222 (4 Credits)
General Botany with Laboratory
This course emphasizes plant life cycles, anatomy, morphology, taxonomy, and evolution. It also considers the principles of genetics, ecology, and physiology. The laboratory will cover plant families with hands on dissection of plants using appropriate dissection equipment and tools. Three lectures and one laboratory period.

Lab fee: $125.00


BIO-130 (4 Credits)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This course examines structure and function of the human body: cells and cellular processes, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor


BIO-131 (4 Credits)
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This course is a continuation of the structure and function of the human body. Study focuses on sensory, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and endocrine system.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in BIO-130 (Human Anatomy and Physiology I) or permission of the instructor


BIO-224 (4 Credits)
Microbiology
This Course is an introductory survey of Anatomy, Physiology and Ecology of Microorganisms. Emphasis on the characteristics of microbes (Particularly the Pathogenic Bacteria- Archaea and Eubacteria).It will also cover Protistians, Fungi Viruses Helminths, Algae, and Arthropods of medical importance. Within this context, bacterial techniques, host-parasite relationships and infection and immunity will be covered.

Prerequisite: BIO-120 (Principles of Biology I) or BIO-122 (Principles of Biology II) or permission of the instructor

BAKING

BKG-101 (8 Credits)
Professional Baking I
The Professional Baking I course provides students with the basic skills and knowledge for entry levels in baking in a professional environment. Instruction focuses on a maximum hands-on experience as well as theory and kitchen safety. Students will be involved in all aspects of baking preparations including breads, sweet breads, assorted pastries, cakes and cake decorating.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or equivalent and MTH-097 or equivalent, or instructor approval.
Course Fee: $100.00


BKG-111 (8 Credits)
Professional Baking I
This course will include baking and pastry theory topics, demonstrations, and hands-on applications. Students will have the opportunity to further develop proficiencies in a variety of breads, fillings, tarts, pies, and specialty desserts. Emphasis will also be on advanced theory topics, skills, and techniques of classical and contemporary pastry arts. Specialty topics will include Genoese, international buttercreams, icings, sugar and chocolate decoration.

Prerequisites: BKG-101 (Professional Baking I) and CUL-102 (Food Service Math)
Course Fee: $100.00


BKG-112 (3 Credits)
Professional Internship
The internship features on-the-job training at different locations. The student improves cooking and baking skills along with developing an understanding of cooperation and respect with regard to fellow workers, supervisors, and future employers.

Prerequisites: BKG-111 (Professional Baking II) or CKG-111 (Professional Cooking II)


BKG-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Commercial Baking
This course covers a variety of topics in the field of commercial baking. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered based upon demand, interest, and need.


BKG-201 (3 Credits)
Art of Grand Finale
Students will learn the art of designing, decorating and plating individual desserts for single-serving and banquet functions. Students will also learn chocolate and pulled-sugar techniques.

Prerequisite: BKG-111 (Professional Baking II)
Course Fee: $100.00


BKG-202 (3 Credits)
Advanced Cake Decorating
Students will learn a variety of cake-baking skills and advanced decorating techniques from single-serving cake portions to wedding cakes to cakes for banquet dessert tables.

Prerequisite: BKG-111 (Professional Baking I
Course Fee: $100.00

COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE

CDL-100 (6 Credits)
General Knowledge and Endorsements
This course covers the general knowledge of combination vehicles, air brakes, tank vehicles, doubles, triples, hazardous material, defensive driving, log books, trip planning, map reading, and drug and alcohol avoidance.


CDL-101 (3 Credits)
Pre-Trip and Backing Skills
This course provides the students opportunities to practice their skills in backing a tractor-trailer. The students will perform straight-line backing, alley docking, parallel parking, conventional and sight-side parking, and backward serpentine control.


CDL-102 (3 Credits)
Defensive Driving and Safe Practices
This course will provide opportunities for students to practice shifting and lane control, left and right turns, light and medium city traffic, Interstate highway navigation, the proper use of on and off ramps, mountain driving, and railroad crossings. Safety is stressed at all times.


CDL-103 (6 Credits)
Driving Skills, Rules, and Regulations
The students will practice over the road skills and perform 108 pre- and post- trip inspections. The students will also learn the skills necessary to be used in hooking and unhooking trailers and securing various loads.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

CHEME-117 (1 Credit)
Introduction to Chemical Laboratory Equipment
A chemical laboratory equipment course that introduces the student to different laboratory equipment and techniques they will use later in the curriculum. Teaches the students about how to use the lab equipment safely and effectively. Topics include, glass wares, PH meters, balances, making solutions, building apparatuses and exposure to all of the standard and commonly used chemical laboratory equipment.


CHEME-115 (2 Credits)
Introduction to Process Industries
A comparative discussion of a number of chemical industries and the details of their processes. Includes unit operations, unit processes and economics. Classification of various process industries includes (oil and gas, chemical, mining, power generation, pulp and paper, water and waste water treatment, food and beverage, and pharmaceutical).


CHEME-130 (2 Credits)
Introduction to Process Operations
Introduction to chemical and refinery plant operations. Topics include process technician process technician duties, responsibilities and expectations; plant organizations; plant process and utility systems; and the physical and mental requirements of the process technician. Also, the course is designed to provide hand-on experience in process operations, instrumentation and controls.


CHEME-202 (4 Credits)
Industrial Chemistry and Lab
Chemical concepts of industry, basic chemical engineering and chemical processing, basic organic chemistry, synthetic polymers, diffusion, fluid flow, heat transfer, air and water pollution, and energy routes.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" in CHEM-120/122 (General Chemistry I / General Chemistry II)


CHEME-222 (4 Credits)
Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering
Use of basic mathematical concepts and computer tools, physical laws, stoichiometry and the thermodynamic properties of matter to obtain material and energy balances for steady and unsteady state systems. This course introduces basic mass and energy balances as preparation for subsequent courses in heat transfer, fluid flow, mass transfer and reaction engineering for physical, chemical, metallurgical and biological processes. All these processes begin with general mass and energy balances.

A grade of "A" in a course equivalent to MTH-121 (College Algebra) or satisfactory placement score


CHEME-223 (3 Credits)
Petroleum Refinery Engineering & Petrochemicals
Topic to be covered include: gasoline, diesel, plastic, rubber, and synthetic fiber, catalytic reforming of naphtha, oil refinery processes, fluid catalytic cracking, ethylene, propylene, steam cracking of natural gas liquids such as ethane and propane, detergents, and adhesives.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" in CHEM-122 (General Chemistry II)


CHEME-224 (4 Credits)
Quality Control in Chemical Engineering
The course will cover how products are designed, manufactured, and brought to market. Additionally, students learn to track how these products perform in the consumer market and how to package and transport products in optimal ways. The course will emphasize on the procedure of the control of the quality and testing methods of products to uncover defects and reporting to management who make the decision to allow or deny product release. The course is a combination of lectures, class work and possible practical training.

A grade of "A" in a course equivalent to MTH-121 (College Algebra) or satisfactory placement score


CHEME-230 (4 Credits)
Practicum in Industry
The course introduces the processes to appropriate practicums and provides counselor trainee experiences that complement classroom learning and help prepare the students for employment. Students will learn how to explore state-approved community treatment agencies and apply for placement with them by developing a resume and cover letter, and interviewing with sites open to student placement. Students will be learn to observe and participate in treatment programs, while practicing professional behavior and learning about the organizations.

CHEMISTRY

CHM-110 (4 Credits)
Elements of Chemistry
This is a one-semester course in general chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics covered include the study of matter, the scientific method, chemistry measurements, environmental chemistry, energy, food, drugs, and health. A lab is included as part of the course.

Lab fee: $125.00


CHM-120 (4 Credits)
General Chemistry I
This course introduces students to chemistry measurements, atomic structure, chemical reactions, gases, thermochemistry, and bonding. A lab is also included as part of the course.

Prerequisite: MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra)
Lab fee: $125.00


CHM-122 (4 Credits)
General Chemistry II
As a continuum on CHM-120, topics in this course include liquids, solids, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. A lab is included as part of the course.

Prerequisite: CHM-120 (General Chemistry I)
Lab fee: $125.00


CHM-254 (4 Credits)
Environmental Chemistry with Lab
This course is a topics-based approach to the chemistry of the environment. Students in this course are expected to have some knowledge of chemistry, with a desire of applying this knowledge to the environment. Topics of interest include environmental chemistry of water, water pollution, water treatment, geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, radioactivity, hazardous materials and resources. Three lectures and one laboratory period.

Lab fee: $125.00


CHM-286 (4 Credits)
Inorganic Chemistry with Lab
Build a descriptive and theoretical framework for understanding inorganic systems. Advanced atomic structure and bonding theories will be applied to understanding the properties and reactions of inorganic compounds. Systematic presentation of properties and reactions of representative elements of the periodic table with application of chemical principles. Theories of electronic structure, stereochemistry, and symmetry properties of inorganic molecules. Three lectures and one laboratory period.

Lab fee: $125.00


CHM-468 (4 Credits)
Organic Chemistry with Lab
Study the fundamentals of bonding, structure and nomenclature of carbon compounds. Introduce the principles of stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms with alkanes, alkenes, alcohols and alkyl halides. Discuss acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, electrophilic addition, and elimination reactions. The laboratory will cover techniques of synthesis, separation and analysis of organic compounds. Three lectures and one laboratory period.

Lab fee: $125.00

COOKING

CKG-101 (8 Credits)
Professional Cooking I
The Professional Cooking I course provides students with the basic knowledge needed for entry into the professional food industry. Instruction focuses on a maximum hands-on experience, as well as theory and food safety and sanitation. Students will be involved in all aspects of meal preparation for the staff, students and community.

Course fee: $100.00


CKG-108 (3 Credits)
Professional Cooking Basics
The Professional Cooking Basics course provides students with the basic knowledge needed to understand the day-to-day operation of a commercial kitchen. The course will involve a strong emphasis on planning and organization of a food service operation which includes recipe breakdown, scheduling, ordering, and menu planning. Students will also learn about the basic cooking styles used in all professional kitchens.

Prerequisite: CUL-101 or BKG-101 (Professional Baking I)
Course fee: $100.00


CKG-111 (8 Credits)
Professional Cooking II
Students advance into more intricate cookery methods associated with dinner and banquet preparation. Table service and banquet setups are also covered. This course also gives the basics of baking and dessert creation.

Prerequisite: CUL-101
Course fee: $100.00


CKG-112 (3 Credits)
Professional Internship
The internship features on-the-job training at different locations. The student improves cooking and baking skills along with developing an understanding of cooperation and respect with regard to fellow workers, supervisors, and future employers.

Prerequisite: CKG-111 (Professional Cooking II) or BKG-111 (Professional Baking II)

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

CMP-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Computers
This is a hands-on course in personal computers, including hardware, operating software, and applications. The class will include an overview of the history of technology and its future, as well as giving a fundamental introduction to industry-standard application software for word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and graphics. Basic computer use, files and file structure, Windows, the Internet, programming, ethics, and security will also be addressed. This course (or a higher level course) is a general education requirement for all degree programs.


CMP-110 (3 Credits)
Desktop Publishing
This hands-on course uses Adobe PageMaker to create professional quality layouts for flyers, signs, invitations, and other complex documents. Concepts such as inserting art into text, text flow, kerning, tracking, artistic text, paragraph text, text-on-path, and document aesthetics are unique to desktop publishing.

Prerequisite: ADM-101 (Keyboard & Formatting I)


CMP-115 (3 Credits)
Database Management Concepts
The Microsoft Access relational database will be used teach this course. Topics covered are the creation of a database, using tables and forms, accessing and querying for information, and creating custom reports.

Prerequisite: CMP-101 (Introduction to Computers) and ADM-101 (Keyboarding & Formatting I) or ADM-105 (MS Excel Applications)


CMP-117 (3 Credits)
Operating Systems
This hands-on course will teach the basics of DOS (Disk Operating Systems) and Microsoft Windows. This class will cover copying disks and files, navigating through directories and subdirectories, and basic troubleshooting.

Prerequisite: CMP-101 (Introduction to Computers)


CMP-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Applied Computers
This course introduces new application software and emerging technologies. The specific course content varies by semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. Typically, the course that is offered under this heading is an elective and is offered according to interest, need, and demand.


CMP-301 (3 Credits)
Digital Publishing
This is an introduction to digital publishing. There is a digital dimension to almost every form of publication in the contemporary world. This is as true for movies and music as it is for books that are printed or that appear as an e-book. Some of the topics aspiring writers need to know about include: Writing and editing on the Web, blogging, web design, electronic editing, dynamic web design for author’s websites, understanding pdf and html, e-book publishing for the Kindle, the Nook, and tablets, and using Twitter, blogs, and Facebook in marketing what you write. Students will be required to produce either a blog using Wordpress or an e-book using Kindle’s e-publishing platform as a requirement to earn a passing grade in the course.

COMMUNICATION

COM-130 (3 Credits)
Public Speaking
This course is designed to help students develop skills in presentational speaking appropriate for a variety of communication contexts. Through in-class oral presentations, students will become more comfortable communicating in public situations and develop their capacity to analyze the presentations of others. The emphasis of the course is on the creation of presentations related to each student’s program/trade.

Prerequisite: ENG-105 (Applied Technical Writing) or ENG-110 (Freshman Composition) or a comparable English course


COM-150 (3 Credits)
Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal communication details a range of personality types that students can expect to interact with at work, within the family, and in friendships. Students learn a variety of methods to relate effectively with others, including defense strategies to use in difficult communicative encounters. This is a hands-on course in which techniques are scripted and practiced through role-playing.

Prerequisite: ENG-105 (Applied Technical Writing) or ENG-110 (Freshman Composition) or a comparable English course.


COM-210 (4 Credits)
Journalism
This course is designed to introduce students to the various kinds of non-fiction writing for the media. Students will progress through the elements of news writing including the essentials of leads, grammar and style, basic structures, research, and interviewing, as well as feature writing and opinion writing. The journalism lab is designed to create a student-managed school newspaper so students can practice and apply the basics of news writing that they study in the classroom.

Prerequisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in or have successfully (earned a grade of "C" or higher) completed ENG-105 (Applied Technical Writing) or ENG-110 (Freshman Composition) or a comparable English course.


COM-195/295 1-3
Topics in Communication
This course addresses a variety of topics in the field of communication. It may include interpersonal and mass communication, mass media studies, media literacy, environmental, health, and family communication, as well as small group and organizational communication. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. This course is offered according to interest, need, and demand.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS-100 (3 Credits)
Programming I
This course introduces the student to some of the basic concepts of programming languages. Statements such as assignments, conditional statements, and loops will be covered. The student will learn how to write simple programs.


CS-120 (3 Credits)
Computational Thinking
This course prepares the student to problem solving, using fundamental concepts of computer science. The latter includes problem solving, abstraction, modularity. Computational thinking can be used to solve problems algorithmically and efficiently.


CS-125 (3 Credits)
Scripting
This course is to introduce the student to writing lightweight computer programs to automate the process of solving certain problems. This course will also be used to familiarize the student with the command-line interface.


CS-150 (3 Credits)
Programming II
This course in a continuation of CS 250, and will cover concepts in the object-oriented language JAVA, such as classes, objects, and inheritance.

Prerequisite: CS-100 (Programming I)


CS-175 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Computer Organization
This course prepares the student for Computer Organization. Binary, octal, and hexadecimal numbers will be covered, as well as conversions from one system into another. Two-complement numbers will be introduced. Assembly language, control mechanisms, memory, input, output will be introduced at a basic level.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

CT-100 (3 Credits)
Residential Construction and Carpentry
This course is designed to prepare students for entry into the Advanced Residential Construction course. Instruction includes identifying and utilizing all tools and machines associated with carpentry, material layout, the cutting, shaping, and assembling of wood products, furniture construction and cabinetry. The course also presents information related to current manufacturing materials and techniques, technologies, and equipment used to produce products for the marketplace. In addition to technical skills, students completing this course will also develop advanced critical thinking, applied academic skills, and career development skills.

Course Fee: $100.00


CT-102 (2 Credits)
Introduction to Technical Drafting
Introduction to the principles of drafting to include terminology and fundamentals, including size and shape descriptions, projection methods, geometric construction, sections, auxiliary views, and reproduction processes.


CT-103 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Craft Skills
Development of skills and techniques necessary for basic construction/industrial maintenance craft skills.


CT-104 (3 Credits)
Concrete and Masonry Construction
A study of the versatility, durability, and mix design of quality concrete. Also included is the study of the use of masonry in modern construction. Both classroom and laboratory experiences will assist students in developing a firm understanding of use concrete and masonry materials.

Lab Fee: $125.00


CT-108 (2 Credits)
Residential Plumbing
In this course, students will be introduced to all aspects of residential plumbing and be able to identify and utilize hand and power tools associated with residential plumbing. In addition, students will begin to learn about site layout and the identification of symbols related to plumbing. This course is designed to teach the basics that students will build upon in the Advanced Residential Plumbing course.


CT-109 (2 Credits)
Basic Electric
This course is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of the electrical trade, including the information and basic skills needed for identification and proper usage of materials, blueprint reading, and the use of hand and power tools associated with residential wiring.


CT-110 (3 Credits)
Advanced Residential Construction and Carpentry
This course provides practical experience and related technical information for occupations specializing in carpentry. Students will learn to utilize layout tools, layout building lines, form concrete, frame floors, walls, roofs, install roofing components, install thermal, sound and moisture protection, install doors, windows, and trim, apply exterior and interior components, apply roof coverings, paint surfaces, and decorative woodworking.

Prerequisite: CT-100
Course fee: $100.00


CT-111 (3 Credits)
Woodworking with Lab
The carpenter’s working tool kit, including shop tools, will be used by students in accordance with pre- established safety practices. Small projects will precede larger ones, and a semester project showing the student’s progress will account for most of the grade.

Course fee: $100.00


CT-112 (3 Credits)
Field Project I
As work becomes available in the field, transportation will be provided to enable students to test their skills at a job site. Industry standards will be emphasized and quality workmanship required. A general understanding of the complete building process will result from the varied tasks asked of each individual.


CT-113 (3 Credits)
Cabinet Making
This course is a continuation of Woodworking I. Shop techniques for cabinetmaking and simple furniture will be introduced and projects will reflect advanced techniques in woodworking.

Prerequisite: CT-111 (Woodworking with Lab)
Course fee: $100.00


CT-114 (3 Credits)
Field Project II
This project will provide students with a second opportunity to perform carpentry fieldwork in the construction industry. On-the-job training (with strict attendance requirements) to fulfill stated production requirements is expected and high quality workmanship is required. A comprehensive view of the complete building process will result from the realistic variety of tasks each student performs.

Prerequisite: CT-112


CT-115 (2 Credits)
Introduction to Blueprint Reading
This course will give students a basic understanding of the skills required to read and interpret blueprints and other documents referring to construction specifications. Emphasis is on terminology, symbols, notations, scaling, dimensioning, and basic blueprint interpretational techniques. Students will recognize and be able to read floor plans, elevation views, sectional views, detail views, and will be able to plot dimensions and specifications. Mathematical calculations associated with blueprint reading will also be introduced.


CTR-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Construction Technology or Carpentry
This course explores a variety of contemporary technologies and applications in the field of construction technology. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered based upon the need, interest, and demand.

COUNSELING

COU-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Counseling Theories
This course provides knowledge in current theoretical approaches to counseling. Theoretical models such as psychodynamic, existential, person-centered, cognitive and behavioral therapy, rational emotive behavioral therapy, family systems, individual, and solution-focused therapies will be studies.


COU-103 (3 Credits)
Personality Psychology
This course will provide a foundational knowledge of the nature and nurture determinants of human behavior. It will include the definition and scientific measurement of personality. Theories studied will include the psychodynamic, Neo-Freudian, biological, humanistic, cognitive, traits, and behavioral theories.


COU-106 (3 Credits)
Counseling Substance Abuse in Schools and Communities
This course will cover substance abuse issues in the society. Substance abuse and addiction within family, impacts to members of the community as well as intervention and treatment approaches will be discussed.


COU-110 (3 Credits)
Internship
Students will do internships in behavioral health facilities to gain practical knowledge about counseling in the areas of substance abuse prevention and treatment, personality psychology, counseling theory, etc.

CULINARY ARTS

CUL-102 (3 Credits)
Food Service Math
Students learn and apply basic mathematics in a working situation using recipe conversions, costing standard recipes, following production sheets, using portion control, and limiting the percentage of food waste.


CUL-103 (3 Credits)
Food Safety & Sanitation
In this course, students will learn about food borne illnesses, kitchen safety, fire hazards, and in-depth kitchen sanitation procedures based on current professional standards. Upon successful completion of the course, students will also receive their Food Handler’s Permit and Serv-Safe certification.


CUL-105 (3 Credits)
Nutrition
This course will cover information regarding nutrition in the food service industry. Topic areas will include fats, carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, minerals, additives, and chemical pesticides. Students will use the food pyramid in relation to menu analysis. The digestive system for food intake will be examined through video presentation. Students will examine product labels, using information from the Food and Drug Administration.


CUL-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Culinary Arts
This course covers a variety of topics in the field of culinary arts. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered based upon demand, interest, and need.


CUL-201 (3 Credits)
ServSafe Essentials
This course will include basic and advanced food safety and sanitation techniques, demonstrations, and hands-on application of local, state, and federal laws. Students will have the opportunity to pass and take the national sanitation test for a National ServSafe Certificate.


CUL-205 (3 Credits)
Food & Beverage Management
This course is designed to introduce the students to all aspects of an operating restaurant and how to apply management skills to successfully run an operation from kitchen to dining room. The students will also learn menu design, wine list organization, bar management, inventory control and executing a successful operational plan.


CUL-206 (3 Credits)
Banquets & Catering
This course will prepare students to plan, prepare a menu for, and execute an off-site catering and an in- house banquet. Students will learn how to plan events ranging from a simple coffee service to an appetizer party to a buffet line to a full five-course sit-down meal.

Course fee: $100.00


CUL-207 (3 Credits)
Management & Supervision
This course is designed to prepare students for focusing directly on the first line hospitality supervisor and applying the wisdom of management theory and experience to the hospitality workplace in down-to-earth terms. The course is also designed to meet the management challenges in terms of the growing need for understanding the basics of human relationships.

DRAFTING COMPUTER-AIDED

DFT-101 (3 Credits)
Technical Drafting
This course will introduce the students to technical drafting, the tools used in drafting, the different types of drafting, and use of both traditional hand drafting and CAD. Students will cover the basics of mechanical drafting, architectural drafting, and civil drafting. Students will learn how to view objects and describe them through technical representations.


DFT-111 (3 Credits)
Mechanical Drafting
This course will cover mechanical drafting techniques using 2-D drafting software as well as 3-D software. The course will cover the essentials of mechanical drafting including orthographic projections, sectional views, auxiliary views, threads, fasteners, and springs, and dimensions.

Prerequisite: DFT-101 (Technical Drafting) or permission of the instructor


DFT-112 (3 Credits)
Architectural Drafting
This course will cover the basics of architectural drafting using 2-D drafting software as well as 3-D software. This course will give the students the tools to create floor plans, electrical plans, plumbing plans, foundation plans, elevations, and sections. The students will utilize the tools learned in Computer -Aided Drafting I and II in order to create construction documents efficiently.

Prerequisite: DFT-120 and DFT-220


DFT-120 (3 Credits)
Computer-Aided Drafting I
This course is designed to help students gain proficiency in computer-aided drafting skills using AutoCAD software. The course will cover the basic commands to create simple AutoCAD 2-D drawings, thereby creating a strong foundation for more advanced tools.


DFT-121 (3 Credits)
Introduction to AutoCAD
This course is designed for the student who wants a general introduction to computer-aided drafting, but is NOT enrolled in the Computer-Aided Drafting program. No previous computer experience is required for this course.


DFT-201 (3 Credits)
Geometric Dimensions and Tolerance
This course is an introduction to general tolerances, symbols and terms, data, material condition symbols, form and profile, tolerance orientation, and local tolerance.

Prerequisite: DFT-111 or permission of instructor.


DFT-210 (3 Credits)
Descriptive Geometry
This course presents the fundamental principles of descriptive geometry using instrument drawing and AutoCAD. The course involves analyzing and solving 3-D problems involving point, lines, planes, and solids as well as advanced auxiliaries and revolutions.

Prerequisites: DFT-111 (Mechanical Drafting) and DFT-220 (Computer-Aided Drafting II) or permission of the instructor


DFT-212 (3 Credits)
Advanced Architectural Drafting
This course will build on the skills obtained in Architectural Drafting (DFT-112) by using mostly 3-D architectural software. Students will create 3-D architectural models, create documents from the models, and learn visualization techniques used in many of today’s architectural firms.

Prerequisite: DFT-112 (Architectural Drafting) or equivalent or permission of the instructor


DFT-220 (3 Credits)
Computer-Aided Drafting II
This course is a continuation of Computer-Aided Drafting I (CAD-120). Students continue to build on the skills obtained in CAD I by using more advanced techniques and 3-D drawing techniques. This course will also show students how to become more efficient and creative in creating drawings. Each student will have the opportunity to take the Autodesk Certified User exam.

Prerequisite: DFT-120 (Computer-Aided Drafting I) or permission of instructor


DFT-230 (3 Credits)
Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting
This is an advanced course based on independent study that can cover advanced subjects in computer -aided drafting and/or geographic information systems such as learning new software or integrating different software applications for a project. The course can be repeated for credit with different subject matter.

Prerequisite: DFT-220 or permission of instructor


DFT-240 (3 Credits)
Building Codes
This course introduces commercial (current International Building Codes) and residential building codes (current International Residential Codes). In addition, accessibility standards such as the American with Disability Act (ADA), fire safety, and space planning. Knowledge of standard building codes will prepare students to apply to floor plans generated in the Architectural Drafting courses.


DFT-250 (3 credits)
Construction Management/Estimation
This course covers the managerial oversight of a construction project and estimation. Topics covered are coordinating, hiring, and fulfilling construction contracts. Emphasis on managing materials, equipment’s, budgets, schedules, and employees.


DFT-290 (3-12 Credits)
Internship
Internship opportunities will be limited to what is available. Students will work part-time to full-time and earn appropriate credit hours accordingly. The internships may include, but are not limited to, mechanical drafting, 3-D application, architectural drafting, 3-D modeling, or civil drafting. The internship must be approved by the instructor and students will be required to prepare oral presentations to appropriate classes as assigned by the instructor.


DFT-195/295 (1-3)
Topics in Computer-Aided Drafting
This course presents a variety of topics related to emerging technologies in the field of computer -aided drafting. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is based upon need, interest, and demand.

EARLY CHILDHOOD MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

ECM-110 (3 Credits)
Child Growth, Development and Learning
This is a basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children (pre-birth through age eight) and will provide students with the foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals by enhancing their knowledge concerning the growth of young children and their development and learning methods. Major theories of child development will be integrated with all aspects of typical and atypical development, including the biological, physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive, and language domains. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development, and learning methods will be emphasized.


ECM-112 (3 Credits)
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
This course instructs students in recognizing and responding to each child’s physical health, emotional well- being, and proper nutritional and safety needs. The course will address how to appropriately plan, maintain, and facilitate the use of indoor and outdoor learning environments in order to promote each child’s physical and emotional well-being, with additional consideration for the requirements of children with special needs.


ECM-116 (3 Credits)
Family and Community Collaboration
This course examines common elements of the culture in order to discover how they formatively influence family systems. We will seek to develop an understanding of how the effects of culture on family structures influence the individual and the perspective through which the world is viewed and interacted upon. Variances (including disabilities, race, ethnicity, gender, and social class) are addressed with respect to interaction with adults and other children.


ECM-125 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Literacy and Reading Development
This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals to promote children’s emergent literacy and reading development. The course lays the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. An integrated language arts perspective and an interdisciplinary approach as it addresses the developing abilities in writing, reading, and oral language in the home and school contexts will be discussed.


ECM-210 (3 Credits)
Guiding Young Children
This class explores various theories of child guidance and the practical application of each. The course provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for preventing and handling classroom discipline problems. Positive discipline strategies for dealing with violence, aggression, anger, and stress will be explored. Emphasis is placed on helping children become self-responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners.


ECM-220 (3 Credits)
Curriculum Development & Implementation I
This course focuses on developmentally appropriate content in early childhood programs. Students will be provided instruction addressing relevant content for teaching and learning experiences for children from birth through age eight. Adapting content areas to meet the requirements of children with special needs, including the development of IFSPs and IEPs, is the focus of this course. Course materials offer instruction in curriculum development in all areas including literacy, arithmetic, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children from birth through age eight.


ECM-220A (2 Credits)
Practicum I
This practicum provides opportunities for students to work six (6) hours per week in an early childhood setting. This on-the-job experience will enable the students to practice competencies learned throughout the course from lectures and the texts. Students will interact with culturally and linguistically diverse communities.


ECM-225 (3 Credits)
Curriculum Development & Implementation II
The course focuses on the learning environment and curriculum implementation in early childhood programs. Instruction uses varying program models and learning environments that meet the individual needs of all young children, including those children with special needs. The class provides the opportunity to create environments for children in which to learn cooperation with peers, responsibility, autonomy, development and learning, literacy, dialogue or expression, and appropriate uses of technology. Students will demonstrate their ability to work collaboratively with educational assistants, volunteers, families, and other family support professionals to individualize the curriculum and to meet program goals.

Prerequisite: ECM-220 (Curriculum Development & Implementation I)


ECM-225A (2 Credits)
Practicum II
This practicum provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from ECM-225 and develop skills in planning learning environments and implementing curriculum in programs serving young children, birth through age eight, including those with special needs.

Prerequisite: ECM-220 (Curriculum Development & Implementation I) and ECM-225 (Curriculum Development & Implementation II)


ECM-235 (3 Credits)
Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs
This course will focus on appropriate programming for and assessment of typical and atypical young children, the role of parents in designing programs for young children, the role of assessment in the development of curricula, and the role of culture and language in the assessment process. This course will familiarize students with a variety of assessment methods and instruments. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process, and involving families in the process. Students will practice observing and recording the behavior of young children and using this information to develop curriculum. Finally, students will become familiar with the New Mexico Standards for Excellence Compliance Manual.


ECM-245 (2 Credits)
Professionalism
The purpose of this course is to have students examine major curriculum models and experience working with children of different ages in a diverse community. The course gives students opportunities to explore a variety of models of early childhood care and education programs from birth to age eight in a multicultural setting. Students will participate in a practicum at three different sites serving children age’s birth to three, three to five years old, and five to eight years old.


ECM-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Early Childhood Multicultural Education
This course addresses a variety of emerging themes in the field of early childhood multicultural education. The course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.


ECM-304 (4 Credits)
Integrated Curriculum: Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K)
This advanced course focuses on developmentally appropriate content, learning environments, and curriculum implementation for children birth-Age 4. It emphasizes integration of content areas (the arts, literacy, math, health/emotional wellness, science, social studies, motor, and adaptive living skills,) and the development of rich learning environments for infants, toddlers, and preschool children.


ECM-310 (3 Credits)
Research in Child Growth, Development, and Learning
This advanced course in child growth, development, and learning builds upon the foundational material covered in the basic course in children growth, development, and learning. An integration of major theories of child development is provided by focusing on contemporary research in all aspects of development, including bio-ecological, social-affective, cognitive-learning, language-cultural, and methodological aspect of research in early childhood development and education. This course focuses on preparing early childhood professional to use empirically-based research to inform their teaching of young children as well as preparing teachers to be researchers in their own classrooms.


ECM-316 (3 Credits)
Family, Language, and Culture
This course analyzes the interrelationships between family, language, and culture and connected to children’s development and learning. In this course language is understood as a human activity and higher mental process which build on the children‘s families, community, and cultural background. Language conceived as human activity must be examined through an understanding of dialogue, because dialogue is a way of promoting positive relationships between home, school, and community, partnerships. In the course of these collaborative partnerships, is vision for a better world and well-being for young children will emerge and concretize in a culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogy.


ECM-318 (4 Credits)
Teaching and Learning: Math and Science
The focus of this advanced curriculum course is on the standards, principles, and practices in teaching mathematics and science to young children in preschool through grade 3. An emphasis is placed on developing a content –rich integrated math and science, curriculum that focuses on children’s development and interests, includes appropriate content, process, environment, and material with an emphasis son problem-solving as the major means of constructing basic concepts. Field experiences, required.


ECM-325 (3 Credits)
Emergent Literacy
This advanced course is designed to prepare early childhood professional to study literacy development, specifically oral language, writing and reading. This course focuses on children from birth through Pre-K, including children with diverse abilities. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses: 1) recent theory and research that translate into practical strategies, assessment materials, and preparation of literacy rich environments, 2) the socio-cultural context in which children develop literacy, 3) culturally, linguistically and developmentally appropriate literacy curricula, 4) process used to determine the appropriateness of various literacy strategies, 5) assessment, evaluation, and accountability, and 5)literacy leadership.


ECM-340 (2 Credits)
Young Children with Diverse Abilities
This course builds on the broad knowledge gained in previous coursework. It provides a specific focus on educational policies, programs, practices, and services appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and early primary children who exhibit delays and disabilities. The course will provide a means toward a deeper understanding and sensitivity to the needs and feelings of children with diverse abilities and their families. The foundation include research of young children their families, cultural sensitivity and competence, and activity-based interventions. Legal requirements of educating the child with disabilities or other special needs will be identified.


ECM-350 (3 Credits)
Advanced Caregiving for Infants and Toddlers
The advanced field-based course is intended to focus students in defining and implementing developmentally appropriate elements of quality programming for infants and toddlers in safe, healthy, responsive, and caring environments. The experiences in the approved setting will emphasize strong nurturing relationships, cultural competence, recognition of diverse learning needs and styles of every child, appropriate guidance techniques, and partnership with the families, culture, and community represented. Students are assisted through the course in advancing their ability to observe, discuss, and implement element of quality programming for infants and toddlers in the home, small-group, or while-group care situation.


ECM-428 (3 Credits)
Teaching and Learning: Reading and Writing
The foundation of this course is an understanding of the reading process including the relationship between reading, writing, listening, and speaking: individual needs and abilities in reading instruction: and how to organize classrooms and select materials to support literacy development. Concepts of phonemic awareness, phonics instruction, vocabulary development, fluency, and comprehensions are integrated with the use of developmentally appropriate authentic assessment techniques, language/literacy immersion, and multicultural children’s literature.


ECM-438 (3 Credits)
Teaching and Learning: Social Studies, Fine Arts, and Movement
The course focuses on the aims, scope, and integration of methods of teaching social studies, the fine arts, and movement across the curriculum. This course emphasizes an integrated approach to teaching the “what and why” of social studies: assessing student learning: planning units, lessons, and activities: developing effective instructional strategies: and acquiring knowledge of social studies content. Concepts of expressive art include the visual arts, music, movement, and dramas.


ECM-490 (2 Credits)
Teaching and Learning Practicum
The field practicum is a co-requisite course with Teaching and Learning Reading and Writing; Teaching and Learning Math and Science; Teaching and Learning Social Studies, Fine Arts, and Movement. The field based component of this set of courses will provide experiences that address curriculum content and practice teaching that is relevant for children birth to age 4 in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways.


ECM-492 (2 Credits)
Student Teaching Program
This course provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Curriculum Development and Implementation II and develop skills in planning learning environments and implementing curriculum in programs serving young children from birth through age eight, including young children with special needs, linguistic and cultural needs. Students will understand and implement the Diné Philosophy of Education. Learning experiences will cover all content areas, including literacy, math, science, social studies, health/wellness, the arts, and adaptive skills for children, birth through age eight.


ECM-493 (3 Credits)
Student Teaching Seminar
This seminar will give students an opportunity to work with a faculty member and focus on knowledge gained from course, classroom experiences, and interaction with others. Students will use practical experiences and observations from the semester long teaching assignment and further develop skills in planning learning environments and implementing curriculum in programs serving young children from birth through age four including young children with special needs, linguistic and cultural needs. Students will implement the Diné Philosophy of Education. Learning experiences will cover all content areas, including literacy, math, science, social studies, health/wellness, the arts, and adaptive skills for children, birth through age eight.


ECM-495 (9 Credits)
Student Teaching
This semester long teaching will offer students an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills gained from classroom learning, theories, practicum, internships, and experiences from the program. Students will work with a faculty member who will guide, offer reflections, and feedback on experience. Students in the program will be placed at school sites according to their particular concentrations and particular to the area they plan to receive certification. Students will apply the Diné Philosophy of Education. Learning experiences will cover all content areas, including literacy, math, science, social studies, health/wellness, the arts, and adaptive skills for children, birth through age four.

ECONOMICS

ECN-111 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Economics
This course introduces the theories, history, and relationships of economics. An introduction to principles of economics will focus primarily on the forces that drive the economy. A brief discussion about consumption, production, pricing, and employment will be included. In addition, an overview of monetary and fiscal policies will be covered. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to identify economic causes for various political and social problems at the national and international levels.


ECN-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Economics
This course addresses a variety of emerging themes in the field of economics. The course content varies each semester so this course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

EE-101 (3 Credits)
Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I
Introduction to fundamentals of electrical engineering theory and practice. This course covers the foundations of engineering problem solving and other skills necessary for success. Students will be taught engineering practice through hands-on approaches. Students will learn basic electrical elements (resistors, capacitors, and inductors), power sources, Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s law.


EE-102 (3 Credits)
Electrical Engineering Fundamentals II
In depth study of electrical theory, analysis and design of electric circuits. This course builds upon the basics presented in EE-101 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals. Resistive networks will be discussed in-depth and solved using node and loop analysis. Operational Amplifiers and applications will be introduced. First and second order circuits will be touched on.

Prerequisite: EE-101 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I) & MTH-162 (Calculus I) or MTH-105 (Mathematics for Engineering Applications)


EE-103 (3 Credits)
Digital Logic Design
A first course in digital logic design. Data types and representations, Boolean algebra, state machines, simplification of switching expressions, and introductory computer arithmetic. Design will include traditional schematic design methods and an introduction to hardware description languages such as VHDL and Verilog.

Prerequisite: EE-101 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals)


EE-195/295/395/495 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Electrical Engineering
Topics courses will address a variety of subjects in emerging areas of Electrical Engineering. Different section numbers indicate different topics so these courses may be repeated for credit if section numbers and topics are different. Only six hours of Topics can be counted towards the B.S.E.E. degree. Courses are offered according to need, interest, and demand.


EE-196 (1-3 Credits)
Freshman Research Project
Freshman level individual or team project under EE faculty direction and guidance. This project provides early student entry into EE hands-on project activity providing practical skills, EE subject exposure and experience. Second semester freshman standing is required. Requires consent by EE faculty mentor and department chair. Different section numbers indicate different topics so these courses may be repeated for credit if section numbers and topics are different. The research courses can be used to clear deficiencies encountered by transfer students and caused by curriculum changes. Freshman Project cannot be counted towards a concentration elective in the B.S.E.E. degree. Courses are offered according to need, interest, and demand.


EE-201 (3 Credits)
Electrical Engineering Fundamentals III
Sinusoidal steady-state analysis and phasors. This course builds upon the basics presented in EE-102 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals II. Application of circuit analysis techniques to solve single-phase and three-phase circuits including power, mutual inductance, transformers and passive filters.

Prerequisite: EE-102 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals II) & MTH-163 (Calculus II) or MTH-105 (Mathematics for Engineering Applications)


EE-202 (3 Credits)
Electrical Engineering Fundamentals IV
Laplace transforms, Fourier series, Bode plots, and their application to circuit analysis. This course is a continuation of EE-201 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals III.

Prerequisite: EE-201 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals III & Mth-310 (Differential Equations) or MTH-105 (Mathematics for Engineering Applications)


EE-203 (3 Credits)
Electronics I
This course will cover fundamental device characteristics including diodes, MOSFETs and bipolar transistors; small- and large-signal characteristics and design of linear circuits. Linear integrated circuitry including Operational amplifiers (Op-Amp) applications and theory will be covered extensively.

Prerequisite: EE-201 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals III), Co-requisite: EE-202 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals IV)


EE-212 (2 Credits)
Instrumentation I
This class introduces students to fundamental laboratory practices and the use of test equipment to measure basic electrical components, DC/AC circuits using ohmmeters, voltmeters, ammeters and oscilloscopes. Units, systems of units and standards will be covered extensively.


EE-223 (3 Credits)
Semiconductors I
This course will introduce students to the operation and fabrication of semiconductor devices. A study of semiconductor fundamentals and physics of semiconductor devices to include: properties of materials and devices used in electrical engineering; theory of operation of semiconductor devices; p-n junction diodes, bipolar transistors (n-p-n and p-n-p), and field-effect devices.

Prerequisites: CHM-120 (General ChemistryI), EE-203 (Electronics I)


EE-230 (3 Credits)
Introduction to VDHL and FPGA
The goal of the course is to introduce digital design techniques using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). This course will cover FPGA architecture, digital design flow and other technologies associated with field programmable gate arrays. The course will involve an extensive amount of labs and projects which will give the students hands-on experience on designing digital systems on FPGA platforms.

Prerequisite: EE-103 (Digital Logic Design)


EE-296 (1-3 Credits)
Sophomore Research Project
Sophomore level individual or team project under EE faculty direction and guidance. The project provides design experience and develops practical skills. Repeatable. Pre: sophomore standing or consent. Requires consent by EE faculty mentor and department chair. Different section numbers indicate different topics so these courses may be repeated for credit if section numbers and topics are different. The research courses can be used to clear deficiencies encountered by transfer students and caused by curriculum changes. Sophomore Project cannot be counted towards a concentration elective in the B.S.E.E. degree. Courses are offered according to need, interest, and demand.


EE-301 (3 Credits)
Signals & Systems
Analytical techniques for continuous-time and discrete-time signal, system, and circuit analysis.

Prerequisite: EE-202 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals IV)


EE-302 (3 Credits)
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
This course will introduce students to static electric and magnetic fields, time varying electromagnetic fields and Maxwell’s equations from an engineering aspect.

Prerequisite: EE-202 (Electrical Engineering Fundamentals IV), PHY-122 (Calculus-Based Physics II) or MTH-105 (Mathematics for Engineering Applications)


EE-303 (3 Credits)
Probability and Random Signals
Introductory discrete and continuous probability concepts, single and multiple random variable distributions, expectation, introductory stochastic processes, correlation and power spectral density properties of random signals, random signals through linear filters.

Prerequisite: EE-301 (Signals & Systems), MTH-310 (Differential Equations)


EE-304 (3 Credits)
Energy Systems & Power Electronics
Three-phase circuits, renewable and conventional energy supply systems, synchronous generators, transformers, induction and DC machines, power electronics for motor speed control and rectification, per unit systems and power system representation.

Prerequisite: EE-302 (Electromagnetic Fields and Waves


EE-310 (3 Credits)
Embedded System Design
Implementation of embedded computer systems focusing on the development of hardware and software for an embedded microcontroller system. Topics include: (i) internal microcontroller architecture, (ii), interfacing peripheral devices, (iii) mixed analog and digital systems, (iv) hardware and software implementation of several systems using a microcontroller and peripherals.

Prerequisite: EE-103 (Digital Logic Design)


EE-312 (2 Credits)
Instrumentation II
This laboratory course covers computer-based instrumentation systems such as Labview and Matlab for applications in electrical engineering. Students will learn how to design computer-based instrumentation systems and will conduct engineering experiments to demonstrate their skills.

Prerequisite: EE-203 (Electronics I), EE-212 (Instrumentation I)


EE-313 (3 Credits)
Summer Internship
Students will work part-time to full-time in an electrical engineering related industry. The internship must be approved by the instructor and students will be required to make written reports and prepare oral presentations to appropriate classes as assigned by the instructor.


EE-320 (3 Credits)
Instrumentation & Process Control
Introduction to the feedback control problem. Modeling and analysis of linear continuous systems in time and frequency domains. Fundamentals of single-input-single-output control system design. Stability criteria. Nyquist and root-locus design. Introduction to analytical design. Z-transforms and digital control. Laboratory design project.

Prerequisite: EE-212 (Instrumentation I), EE-301 (Signals & Systems)


EE-330 (3 Credits)
Computer Org. & Assembly Language Programming
Introduction to computer organization, how major components in a computer system function together in executing a program, and assembly language programming.

Prerequisite: EE-230 (Introduction to VDHL and FPGA


EE-343 (3 Credits)
Introduction to VLSI Design
This course provides an introduction to VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) systems by examining basic CMOS logic circuits and VLSI design styles. VLSI architectures and current trends in chip design are investigated. Students will work in groups on a project specific to the function of a large digital system and lay out its physical design, and verify and debug its digital behavior. Students will be introduced to modern Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software.

Prerequisite: EE-223 (Semiconductors I)


EE-370 (3 Credits)
Electrical Machinery Operating principles and modeling of different types of electric machines including DC, brushless DC, induction, permanent magnet and conventional synchronous machines; control aspects of these machines within modern electric drives for applications such as industry automation, energy conservation through variable speed drives, wind generators and electric vehicles.

Prerequisite: EE-302 (Electromagnetic Fields and Waves


EE-396 (1-3 Credits)
Junior Research Project
Junior level individual or team project under EE faculty direction and guidance. The project provides design experience and develops practical skills. It may be a continuation of EE 296 or a new project. Repeatable. Pre: 296 and junior standing or consent. Requires consent by EE faculty mentor and department chair. Different section numbers indicate different topics so these courses may be repeated for credit if section numbers and topics are different. The research courses can be used to clear deficiencies encountered by transfer students and caused by curriculum changes. Junior Project can be counted for up to three hours concentration elective in the B.S.E.E. degree. Courses are offered according to need, interest, and demand.


EE-403 (3 Credits)
Digital VLSI
The course will cover design methodologies of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits that are seen in the industry. There will be a brief review of integrated Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) device basics. The fundamentals of device configurations in circuits, and its logic circuit building blocks (inverters, latches, etc.) will also be covered. This course will be largely based on a design project in which the students will design, analyze, and optimize a small CMOS circuit.

Prerequisite: EE-343 (Introduction to VLSI Design


EE-406 (3 Credits)
Computer Networks
Internetworking, unicast and multicast routing, congestion control, network quality of service, mobile networking, router architectures, network-aware applications, content dissemination systems, network security, and performance issues.

Prerequisite: MTH-205 (Discrete Mathematics)


EE-407 (3 Credits)
Communications Systems
Communication System Components, Communication media, Channel capacity and noise, Modulation and Demodulation, Sampling, Aliasing and Interpolation, Correlation and Spread-Spectrum CDMA, Pulse Shaping and Eye Diagrams, Matched Filtering, Carrier Recovery and PLL, OFDM and MIMO, Equalization. (Labs and projects)

Prerequisite: EE-303 (Probability and Random Signals)


EE-413 (3 Credits)
Analog VLSI
This course will examine the design methodologies of very large scale integration (VLSI) analog circuits. Students will work on group projects and perform computer simulations to design, analyze and test analog circuits.

Prerequisite: EE-343 (Introduction to VLSI Design)


EE-423 (3 Credits)
Capstone Design
An extended team design project to expose students to problem situations and issues in engineering design similar to those encountered in industry. (Writing Intensive Course)

Prerequisite: IE-380 (Project Management)


EE-430 (3 Credits)
Computer Architecture and Design
Computer architecture using processors, memories, and I/O devices as building blocks. Issues involved in the design of instruction set architecture, processor, pipelining and memory organization. Design philosophies and trade-offs involved in Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) architectures.

Prerequisite: EE-230 (Introduction to VDHL and FPGA


EE-440 (3 Credits)
Operating Systems I
Introduction to operating systems using UNIX as the case study. System calls and utilities, fundamentals of processes and interprocess communication.

Prerequisite: EE-430 (Computer Architecture and Design


EE-460 (3 Credits)
Electrical Power Plants
Generation of electric power using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean, energy sources. Power plant thermal cycle analysis. Cogeneration and combined cycles. Economics, operations, and design of electric power stations. Energy storage.

Prerequisite: EE-304 (Energy Systems & Power Electronics


EE-470 (3 Credits)
Electric Power Drives
Analyzes devices used for short circuit protection, including circuit breakers, relays, and current and voltage transducers. Protection against switching and lightning over voltages. Insulation coordination.

Prerequisite: EE-304 (Energy Systems & Power Electronics)


EE-471 (3 Credits)
Power System Analysis
Review of transmission line parameter calculation. Zero sequence impedance, symmetrical components for fault analysis, short circuit calculation, power flow analysis, power system stability, and power system control concepts.

Prerequisite: EE-460 (Electrical Power Plants)


EE-472 (3 Credits)
Power Electronics and Power Management
Principles of switch mode power conversion, analysis, design and control of dc-dc converters, PWM rectifiers and inverters, power management, power electronics applications in information technology, renewable energy systems, motion control and lighting.

Prerequisite: EE-470 (Electric Power Drives)

ELECTRICAL TRADES

ELC-101 (4 Credits)
Electrical Level I
This course includes theory of electricity, electron theory of current, resistance and voltage, conducting and insulating materials, electron magnetic induction, circuit fundamentals, series circuits, parallel circuits, voltage drops, safety and grounding, bonding, wiring systems, and correct use of tools and equipment. All practical applications will follow New Mexico and National Electrical Codes.

Prerequisite: CT-103 (Introduction to Craft Skills)


ELC-102 (2 Credits)
Electrical Trades Lab I
Lab I instruction will include additional practical wiring applications such as non-metallic, single-pole, three- way and four-way switches, duplex receptacles, lamps or fixtures, ground fault circuit interrupter, small appliance circuits, electric range circuits, and electric dryer circuits. This course is for students who wish to obtain an Electrical Trades Certificate and is not a required course for students working toward their A.A.S. in Energy Systems. Installation will be in accordance with New Mexico as well as national electrical codes.

Prerequisite: CT-103 (Introduction to Craft Skills)
Lab fee: $125.00


ELC-111 (4 Credits)
Commercial Wiring
Advanced instruction in the study of electricity will be covered. Areas of instruction will include safety and grounding essentials, wiring systems, device wiring, branch circuits, service entrance components, service locations, service rating, sizing services, power disturbances, building categories and service schemes, low voltage, basic motor control, mobile home service, and light commercial wiring. Hands-on applications are included and will follow the National Electrical (NEC) to determine correct procedures in installation, fabrication, design, and testing of electrical equipment.

Prerequisite: ELC-101 (Electrical Level I) and CT-103 (Introduction to Craft Skills)


ELC-112 (2 Credits)
Electrical Trades Lab II
This is a continuation of Electrical Trades Lab I. This course is designed to us e various raceways such as electrical metallic tubing and rigid metal conduit in construction. Students are taught how to use benders and the computations and placement of conduit for fabrication and installations. Supervised work- experience/internship will enhance students’ abilities in problem solving and allow them to gain knowledge and experience in the installation of wiring protection, wiring methods, materials, and equipment during for general use electrical work. The National Electrical Code will be used to determine correct procedures in the installation, fabrication, design, and testing of electrical equipment. This course is for students who wish to obtain an Electrical Trades Certificate and is not a required course for students working toward their A.A.S. in Energy Systems.

Prerequisite: ELC-102 (Electrical Trades Lab I)
Lab fee: $125.00


ELC-113 (4 Credits)
Residential/Commercial Banquet
Basic instruction is provided in reading and interpreting blueprints and specifications. Emphasis is on terminology, symbols, notations, scaling, dimensions, and basic blueprint drawing techniques. Construction methods, materials, and structural support of residential, commercial, and industrial building are also covered. Lab instruction will facilitate student knowledge to determine correct sizing, placement, and design of electrical components in residential and light commercial buildings. Load calculations include computed load for general lighting, small and large appliances, air conditioning, heating, and space heating. The National Electrical Code (NEC) book will be used to ascertain pertinent rules, explanatory data, tables, and examples.


ELC-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Electrical Trades
This course presents a variety of emerging technologies, and applications of those technological improvements, in the electrical trades. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered based on demand, need, and interest.

ENGLISH

ENG-098 (3 Credits)
Reading and Writing Skills
This course teaches vocabulary and grammar skills in addition to strengthening reading comprehension. Other strategies like skills-based exercises, reading silently and aloud, and writing exercises will be applied with the focus are on improving both written and oral communication skills. Using lecture, lab, and individual tutoring, students will learn to read and understand a variety of diverse texts and draft short essays using differing rhetorical forms. Successful completion of this course involves participation in class lectures, occasional computer lab work as assigned, and individual tutoring if necessary.


ENG-105 (3 Credits)
Applied Technical Writing
This course focuses on a variety of on-the-job communication skills such as writing memos and business letters, creating specific sets of instructions, preparing short reports, designing visual aids, and developing effective job search strategies including preparing resumes, writing letters of application, conducting online job searches, improving interview skills, and creating a job search timeline. In addition, students will be introduced to basic research skills for conducting Internet and library research and learn how to credit their research sources using accepted reference styles such as APA and/or MLA. An oral presentation skills component is also included as well as a number of informal opportunities to improve speaking skills.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or satisfactory placement scores


ENG-110 (3 Credits)
Freshman Composition
This course is designed to refine reading, writing and analytical skills through a wide variety of literary offerings, and includes the completion of a series of essays. Vocabulary expansion and a review of English grammar and mechanics are incorporated components of this course. Students will be introduced to basic research skills for conducting Internet and library research and learn how to credit their research sources using accepted reference styles such as APA and/or MLA. Opportunities to practice and improve oral communication skills will also be incorporated throughout the course.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or satisfactory placement scores


ENG-111 (3 Credits)
Composition and Research
This course further develops the skills learned in ENG 110 with an added focus on research techniques and writing that require the use of the MLA documentation style as the primary style of documentation (APA and Chicago documentation styles will also be addressed briefly). A further review of English grammar and mechanics is included as well as opportunities for oral communication skills enhancement.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ENG-105 (Applied Technical Writing) or (Freshman Composition)


ENG-112 (3 Credits)
Technical Research and Writing
This college-level research writing course focuses on APA documentation style (MLA and Chicago documentation styles will also be briefly discussed) to produce technical writing designed specifically for workplace and designated professional goals. Students will learn several phases of a major project including surveys, field reports, reporting laboratory experiments, and creating final written and oral presentations. Students learn how to design, edit, proofread, publish, and present their projects.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ENG-105 (Applied Technical Writing) or ENG-110 (Freshman Composition) or an equivalent course


ENG-150 (3 Credits)
Introduction Literature
This introductory survey course emphasizes the appreciation of poetry, short stories, drama, and the novel. This course may be taken to fulfill the general education Humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: C or higher in ENG-110 (Freshman Composition) or permission of instructor. This course may not be offered every semester.


ENG-155 (3 Credits)
Creative Writing
This course is composed of writing, writing, writing, and creativity. Students will study advice from well- known writers on how to live in the writing life, practice many writing techniques, study character development in fictional and non-fictional writing, and begin to peel away layers of emotional defense that may keep us from writing authentically. The course may be taken to fulfill the general education Humanities requirement or simply for the fun of writing creatively.

This course may not be offered every semester


ENG-160 (3 Credits)
Native American Literature
Students in this course will look at a cross-section of Native American literature focusing on contemporary fiction. Students will explore issues relevant to the study of Native American literature and to other literature in general. In addition, the course will attempt to broaden the student’s understanding of literary devices, while exploring the voices of Native people in the twenty-first century. This course may be taken to fulfill the general education Humanities requirement.

This course may not be offered every semester


ENG-161 (3 Credits)
Comparative Ethnic Literature
This course is a survey of ethnic literature featuring African, Asian, Native American, and Latin writers. Themes that will be covered include cultural identification, celebrations and rituals, the role of an oral tradition and its transmission and transformation in written works, stylistic innovations, the use of language, and exploration of the authors as individuals and members of a community. This course may be taken to fulfill the general education Humanities requirement.

This course may not be offered every semester


ENG-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in English Studies
This course focuses on a variety of topics in the field of English such as screen writing, magazine article writing, gender or author specific writing, and other related areas. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.


ENG-201 (3 Credits)
Beginning Fiction Writing
This introductory course builds on the basic concepts introduced in ENG-155 (Creative Writing) and concentrates on the writing of prose fiction. Students are introduced to the basic elements and techniques of the successful short story. Process is emphasized. Students read, write, and discuss fiction. One draft is work-shopped.

Prerequisite: ENG-155 (Creative Writing)


ENG-202 (3 Credits)
Beginning Poetry Writing
This course is an introduction to the basic elements of the art of poetry. Students will learn how to scan lines for meter and rhythm, learn to analyze in detail the use of figures such a metaphor, metonymy, personification, allusion, and identify and appreciate techniques of sound and structure. Students will explore and discuss figures of logic like irony, parody, allegory and perspective. Students will learn to understand and appreciate the human condition through the voices and poems of diverse people.

Prerequisite: ENG-155 (Creative Writing)


ENG-203 (3 Credits)
Beginning Writing for Stage & Screen
This introductory course, writing for the Screen and Stage I, is first in a three-part series of courses related to the craft of writing scripts for the screen and stage. Students will be introduced to paradigms for playwriting scripts and the motion picture screenplay structure. Students will also be introduced to the basic elements of playwriting. Students will study concepts developed by successful scriptwriters and playwrights, both Native and non-native. Students will practice scriptwriting techniques and explore concepts of character development while crafting the first twenty pages of a full length script for either the stage or the screen.


ENG-205 (3 Credits)
Contemporary Navajo Literature
While the Navajo people have always had a deep appreciation for the power and beauty of language, as reflected in the songs, prayers and stories that have sustained them through untold generations, it is not until recently that a number of Navajos have begun to write and publish widely in a number of different genres. Some of those writers are now attracting critical attention and winning prestigious literary prizes. This course will introduce students to some of those Navajo writers and their works. Some of the major themes, issues, and concerns that these writers share as a focus of their work will be discussed, as well as the new and still-evolving role of the writer in contemporary Navajo culture.


ENG-301 (3 Credits)
Intermediate Fiction Writing
This intermediate course builds on the concepts introduced in 200, and emphasizes workshop critiques of student drafts. Focus on workshop vocabulary, strategies for revision, and reading as a writer. Writing intensive: drafting, work-shopping, and revising. Students publish one story on the class website.

Prerequisite: ENG-200


ENG-302 (3 Credits)
Intermediate Poetry Writing
This intermediate course builds on the concepts introduced in ENG 200 and introduces students to modern forms and techniques. Focus on the process of writing poetry, taking risks and developing voice, and using the critical vocabulary to critique constructively. Emphasizes writing as a reader and incorporates the workshop critique of student’s drafts.


ENG-303 (3 Credits)
Intermediate Writing for Stage & Screen
This course, writing for the Screen and Stage II, is second in a three-part series of courses related to the craft of writing scripts for the screen and stage. Students will analyze three scripts using techniques introduced in the prerequisite to this course (Writing for the Screen and State I). Paradigms for playwriting scripts and the motion picture screenplay structure will be applied as students continue crafting film and stage projects. The basic elements of playwriting will be expanded and students will apply techniques and concepts developed by successful native and non-native scriptwriters and playwrights. Students will also become proficient in script writing techniques, explore concepts of character development and continue developing their scripts using industry approved software.


ENG-304 (3 Credits)
Creative Non-Fiction
This course builds on the basic concepts introduced in ENG 155 and concentrates on the writing of non-fiction prose such as the personal essay, the memoir, and invented forms. Emphasis on the crafting compelling and creative narratives derived from personal experience, insight, and vision. Expands to include an exploration of techniques of creative non-fiction such as prosody, exposition, descriptive detail, and narrative voice.


ENG-401 (3 Credits)
Advanced Fiction Writing
This course is an advanced workshop for students who have mastered the fundamentals of short story writing. Strong emphasis on discussion and revision. Combines formal workshop critique with study of published authors and some theory. Students are acquainted with the process of publishing in print and electronic forms.

Prerequisite: ENG-300


ENG-402 (3 Credites)
Advanced Poetry Writing
This course is an advanced workshop for students who have mastered the basic elements and techniques of poetry and are concentrating on poetry writing. Emphasis on intensive discussion and revision. Combines formal workshop with study of published authors and some theory. Students are acquainted with the process of publishing in print and electronic forms.


ENG-403 (3 Credits)
Advanced Writing for Stage & Screen
This course, writing for the Screen and Stage III, is the final part in a series of courses related to the craft of writing scripts for the screen and stage. Students will have mastered paradigms for playwriting scripts and the motion picture screenplay structure. Students will have mastered the basic elements of playwriting. Students will know the concepts developed by successful scriptwriters and playwrights, both Native and non-native. Scripts for the screen/stage will be completed and the best practices for writing techniques and concepts of character development will be mastered and apparent in full-length film/stage scripts created using software that meets the industry’ s standards. An Environmental Scan of the Theater and Motion Picture industry will be required. Students will master the concepts of script writing techniques and explore concepts of character development. The course will include The Writer’s Table Workshop where students will give and receive peer feedback and participate in storytelling, including the Oral Tradition.


ENG-404 (3 Credits)
Creative Writing Thesis
This course enables third-year Creative Writing majors to select, edit, revise, refine and complete a thesis portfolio that contains a collection of polished work in the genres of their choice (poetry, fiction, writing for creative nonfiction, scriptwriting) written during their first and second years. There will be a review of technical terms and trends in contemporary poetry, fiction and drama to insure a sound knowledge of literature. The process will be undertaken with the guidance of a faculty member chosen by the student.

Prerequisite: Major in creative writing and third-year standing


ENG-405 (3 Credits)
Student Anthology
This course is an introduction to the process of producing an anthology of writing. Students collaborate with faculty and peers to learn to select, edit, design and publish a collection of creative work in print and electronic form. Students critique and evaluate submitted work and oversee all aspects of production.

ENGINEERING

ENGR-103 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Engineering
This course introduces the students to the engineering profession, ethics, engineering tools, and future trends. The students will work in team projects as well. The student will have a sound understanding of the engineering field and will have begun the mastery of the basic knowledge and skills required for all engineering fields offered at Navajo Technical University.

Prerequisite: MTH-121 (College Algebra)


ENGR-123 (3 Credits)
Computer Skills for Engineering
This course reviews the use of fundamental operations and features of the Microsoft Windows operating system. A set of projects are assigned to utilize the most commonly used features of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint (or other presentation software) and to introduce other features which are important to engineering analysis and related report generation. The basic capabilities of Matlab are utilized to perform calculations to generate graphs and to solve equations, as well as to organize and document solutions to a variety of engineering analysis problems.


ENGR-130 (3 Credits)
Engineering Graphics
In this course the basic principles of Engineering Graphics, blueprint reading and geometric constructions are reviewed. Multi-view projections and 3D visualization, and basic dimensioning are introduced. This course is intended for but, not restricted to, on-line delivery. The course also introduces students to solid modeling and basic methods of rapid prototyping including 3-D printing.


ENGR-143 (3 Credits)
Characteristics of Engineering Materials
This course introduces the basic features of materials and selected methods of Classification of Materials. Topics include Nature of Materials, Types of Materials, Scale of Materials, Properties of Materials, Application of Materials, Processing of Materials, and Characterization Methods for Classification of Materials.


ENGR-169 (3 Credits)
Basic Statistics and Probability
This course will introduce students to Descriptive Statistics, presentation of Statistical Data and the field of Probability. Probability will include manipulation of probabilities and conditional probabilities. Discrete distributions, Continuous distributions and Joint probability will also be covered.

Prerequisite: MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra)


ENGR-230 (3 Credits)
Advanced Engineering Graphics
This course will use 3-D mechanical software to explain proper solid modeling techniques used for rapid prototyping, analysis, and other applications which require 3-D models. The students will learn the 3-D tools and techniques used by NASA and contractors such as Lockheed Martin, Aerojet, Boeing, and others.

Prerequisite: ENGR-130 (Engineering Graphics)


ENGR-234 (3 Credits)
Inferential Engineering Statistics
Hypothesis testing for single samples and more statistical distributions can be discussed. Understanding of ANOVA and regression can be incorporated which has not been extensively a part of this course in the past.

Prerequisite: MTH-121 (College Algebra) & ENGR-169 (Basic Statistics and Probability)


ENGR-236 (3 Credits)
Inferential Engineering Statistics
The new ENGR-236 Inferential Engineering Statistics will have more time can be spent on Hypothesis testing for single samples and more statistical distributions can be discussed. Understanding of ANOVA and regression can be incorporated which has not been extensively apart of this course in the past. Part of this change will be in switching to a new book which has more material and goes into more depth with examples and techniques not included in the present text; this book will be used for both courses.

Prerequisite: MTH-121 (College Algebra) & ENGR-169 (Basic Statistics and Probability)


ENGR-313 (3 Credits)
Engineering Economics
Topics covered include: cost and worth comparison, capital costs, time value of money, replacement economics, taxes, economic efficiency of alternate designs, minimum costs and maximum benefits, risk and uncertainty. Students will learn how to apply economics to engineering projects in order to ensure projects are feasible and efficiently designed and completed.

ENERGY SYSTEMS

ERS-102 (3 Credits)
Photovoltaic Theory & Design
An overview covers photovoltaic modules, mounting, controllers, batteries, inverters, load calculations, and water pumping. Solar site analysis will include azimuth angle, tilt angle, magnetic declination, and orientation. Students will learn how to design systems that complement module and energy storage. Understanding safe installations, which includes tool and equipment safety, conductor size, over-current protection, grounding, and NEC requirements will be stressed. Students will install photovoltaic systems and hardware. This course will enable student to interpret schematics to assess learning and to utilize the solar trailer and PV trainer donated to the school by Sandia National Laboratories.

Prerequisites: ELC-101 (Electrical Level I) & MTH-121 (College Algebra)


ERS-104 (3 Credits)
Electrical Mathematics
Electricity and electronics involve an invisible motion of electrons within electrical circuits. Computer -aided models and integrated mathematics will enable students to conceptualize events taking place in circuits. Practical math formulas used in the electrical field will be studied. Areas of study will also include unity of measurements, solving of Ohm’s Law, voltage drop, and solutions to electrical math problems. Study of basic electronics will be introduced; terminology and the use of resistors, diodes, transistors, and capacitors will be included and hands-on electrical/electronic projects will enhance student learning.

Prerequisites: MTH-113 (Technical Mathematics II)


ERS-106 (3 Credits)
Wind and Solar Power
This course will introduce students to the theory, design, and assembly of wind turbines, air collectors, and solar heating systems. Stand-alone, grid-tied, and hybrid systems will be covered. The study of wind resources, net metering, battery sizing and arrangement (series or parallel) will determine days of autonomy, wiring configurations, and inverter efficiency. Hands-on projects will include the fabrication of a 500 watt wind turbine, tower lifting, maintenance of a 2.5 KW grid-connected wind turbine, anemometers, and fabrication of a solar dryer designed to dry food. The course is designed to enhance and develop skills that are needed to meet the challenges of becoming a qualified renewable energy technician.

Prerequisites: ELC-101 (Electrical Level I) & MTH-121 (College Algebra)


ERS-114 (3 Credits)
National Electrical Code (NEC) Exam Prep
This course will focus on preparation for the journeyman electrician exam. General information for learning methods on how to use the code, code arrangement, code enforcement, and code interpretations will be presented. Emphasis on code questions regarding wiring and protection, wiring methods and materials, equipment for general use and special occupancies, load calculations, special equipment and conditions, communication systems, cross sections of conduit and conductors, and conductor properties will also be studied. A series of code research projects will enable students to be better prepared to obtain licensing by a governing board or agency. The use of computers and software will be included to enhance code research assignments.

Prerequisite: ELC-101 (Electrical Level I)


ERS-115 (4 Credits)
Motor Controls
Classroom instruction and lab applications related to motor controls will be introduced. Installation of motors and control equipment, interpretation of symbols and schematic diagrams, start/stop pushbuttons, forward/reverse jogging controls, relays, sensors, and devices will be covered. Installations of conductors, raceways, and components of current protection will ensure students’ confidence in performing similar work in the energy industry. An overview of programmable logic controllers will also be included.

Prerequisites: ERS-102 & ERS-106

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

ENV-102 (4 Credits)
Environmental Science I
This course introduces students to the broad field of Environmental Science. Topics covered in Environmental Science I include environmental problems and their causes, history of resource conservation, scientific modeling, matter and energy concepts, ecosystems and how they function, population dynamics, geological processes, and renewable and non-renewable energy resources. Required lab is included.

Prerequisites: BIO-110 (Elements of Biology) or CHM-110 (Elements of Chemistry)
Lab fee: $125.00


ENG-182 (4 Credits)
Environmental Science II
This course will cover advanced concepts and subjects within Environmental Science. Covered topics include air and water pollution, nuclear waste management and disposal, soil erosion, water management and the hydrological cycle, toxicology, minerals and soil properties, endangered species management, solid and hazardous waste, economics and politics in the environment, and environmental ethics. Extended field trips are scheduled for this course. Lab included.

Prerequisite: ENV-102 (Environmental Science I)
Lab fee: $125.00


ENG-216 (4 Credits)
Fundamentals of Ecology with Laboratory
A study of the relationships among organisms and their environments, at several different levels and scales. This course provides an overview of the complex and diverse field of ecology, from the ecology of individual organisms and their adaptations to the environment, to the dynamics of populations and species interactions in ecological communities, and the intricacies of energy flow and nutrient cycling in ecosystems. Three lectures and one laboratory period.

Lab fee: $125.00


ENV-245 (4 Credits)
Natural Resources I
This course will introduce the student to the management of natural resources. Topics covered include natural resource conservation, management, and resource protection. Flora and fauna surveys will be conducted to provide a field investigation experience. Endangered species conservation, protection, and mitigation will be covered. An extended field outing with assignments is required in this course. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00


ENV-289 (4 Credits)
Natural Resources II
This course will provide a more in-depth study of natural resource use and management. Concepts to be covered in this course include forestry management techniques, watershed management, wildlife management, flora and fauna field identification and collection methods, dendrology, bird, reptile, and fish identification. An extended fishing outing with assignments is required in this course. Lab included.

Prerequisite: ENV-201
Lab fee: $125.00


ENV-255 (4 Credits)
Introduction to Hydrology
This course is an introduction to the hydrological cycle and the processes of precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, runoff, and infiltration. Students will be able to describe the hydrologic cycle and understand the physical principles that govern groundwater and surface water hydrology. The course includes a laboratory component that allows students to gain field experience in measuring water levels in water wells, stream gauging, making indirect discharge measurements, and collect water-quality samples from sources of groundwater and surface water.

Prerequisites: MTH-121 (College Algebra) and ENG-110 (Freshman Composition)


ENV-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Environmental Science and Natural Resources
This course focuses on a variety of emerging issues, technologies, and applications in the field of environmental science, including natural resource management, preservation, and development. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.


ENV-312 (3 Credits)
Summer Internship
This is not a course per se, it is a way for students to experience hands-on learning and gain experience in the area of science. There are several opportunities for students to gain this experience and may apply and accept internships with many different organizations. The student is required to have an internship that is at least 10 weeks in duration, lasting 40 hours per week, and the student is to submit weekly reports regarding the internship and, upon their return to campus, they are to present a 30 minute power point summary of the knowledge they gained in their internship experience.


ENV-350 (3 Credits)
Environmental Law
This course covers the basic principles of law from how a bill becomes a law, the three branches of government and how they affect the development of laws, state and federal law jurisdiction, federalism, commerce clause, and the fundamental framework for law in the United States. This course also covers rule making, adjudication, enabling legislation, and how administrative agencies are created and how they can change their regulations. Lastly, the National Environmental Policy Act is covered and includes the Categorical Exclusion, Environmental Assessment, and the Environmental Impact Statement documents.


ENV-365 (4 Credits)
Natural Resources Management with Laboratory
This course is presented as an introduction into the field of natural resources management with many areas touched upon such as fisheries, forestry, soils, natural resource regulations and law, tribal natural resources management, and traditional perspectives of natural resources. Students will be exposed to the range of disciplines contributing to effective natural resources management and will learn of the variety of career options in the field. Three lectures and one laboratory period.

Lab fee: $125.00


ENV-395 (1 Credit)
Special Topics in Environmental Science and Natural Resources
This course focuses on a variety of emerging issues, technologies, and applications in the field of environmental science, including natural resource management, preservation, and development. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.


ENV-425 (3 Credits)
Advanced Environmental Law
This course introduces some of the most important concepts, issues, and statutes in environmental law. After discussing the economic and ethical bases for environmental law and briefly reviewing the relevant principles of constitutional and common law, students examine a representative selection of federal statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, "Superfund," and the Clean Air Act.


ENV-464 (3 Credits)
Capstone
Learn skills that prepare students for a career in the environmental science field. The class will be broken up into two parts, the first part will focus on resume writing, applying and interviewing for jobs/graduate school, and exploring career opportunities. The second part will focus on a senior project that will consist of writing an Environmental Assessment Draft for an existing or future project. Student will review literature and laws that must be considered in an assessment and determine the important components of as assessment including the Biological Evaluation, Archaeological Survey, and field flora and fauna of the proposed project site. This course will conduct an actual Environmental Assessment as a service learning project.


ENV-485 (3 Credits)
Environmental Regulation Enforcement
This course covers the major environmental laws as they pertain to wildlife, natural resources, pollution, and environmental regulation and enforcement in the United States. The federal agencies responsible for regulation enforcement to protect these natural resources are covered including their respective responsibilities. Students will gain knowledge on how regulations are developed, amended, and enforced in the United States. Major laws covered include the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and environmental laws of the Navajo Nation.

GEOLOGY

GEO-101 (4 Credits)
Principles of Geology
This course combines classroom discussion and laboratory study. It is offered for anyone with a desire to understand more earth processes such as rock formation, mountain building, volcanoes, and earthquakes. Areas of emphasis will be the geologic history of New Mexico and environmental issues such as mining, waste disposal, and groundwater contamination. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00


GEO-150 (4 Credits)
Environmental Geology
This course combines classroom discussion and laboratory study. The course emphasizes the environmental geology of the Navajo Nation and New Mexico. Issues such as mining, waste disposal, rockslides, soil contamination, power plants, and ground water depletion and contamination are topics of discussion in the course. Emphasis is placed on a hands-on, problem-solving approach to today’s issues and the course usually involves field trips around New Mexico and Colorado as part of the included lab study.

Lab fee: $125.00

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

GIT-105 (3 Credits)
Fundamentals of Cartography
This course covers the design, purpose, use, and proper development of maps. Concepts covered include mapping with online Geographic Information System (GIS) software, vector vs. raster data, and history of mapmaking, the map design process, the legend editor, classification in the legend editor, palettes, typography, map projections, scale, and layout. Upon completion of the course, students are able to understand the basic implementation of map design to produce quality maps.

Offered: Online


GIT-110 (3 Credits)
Geographic Information Systems I
This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System (GIS). Students will use GIS computer software to familiarize themselves with the functionality of using spatial data, thereby gaining an understanding of the concept of the points, lines, and polygons used to define GIS themes. Fundamental concepts of computer science will be introduced, providing the foundation of GIS knowledge that will be built upon in subsequent classes.

Prerequisite: MTH-121 (College Algebra)
Offered: Fall, Online


GIT-111 (3 Credits)
Geographic Information Systems II
In this course, the study of spatial analysis, raster processing, digital terrain modeling, map arithmetic, and advanced GIS structures will be studied through hands-on laboratory assignments designed to provide time for students to master these skills. Practical application of GIS software will be utilized.

Prerequisite: GIT-110 (Geographic Information Systems I)
Offered: Spring, Online


GIT-202 (4 Credits)
Remote Sensing
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of remote sensing, with specialized applications in the new technologies and GIS. The focus of the course is to help students understand the current state of knowledge in remote sensing. Lab included.

Prerequisite: MTH-121 (College Algebra)
Offered: Fall, Online
Lab fee: $125.00


GIT-207 (3 Credits)
Software Applications
This course is designed to explore the use of GIS in specific problem solving contexts. The goal is to enable students to recognize and define a geographic problem, apply methodologies that permit analysis of the problem, design a series based on analytical steps, and to finally implement a solution using GIS software.

Prerequisite: GIT-111 (Geographic Information Systems II)
Offered: Fall, Online


GIT-210 (1 Credit)
Service Learning Project
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills (learned in the Geographic Information Technology program) to a real world learning project. The project will be determined by the students and instructor and will be designed to enhance classroom and lab training through application in a worksite setting.

Prerequisite: GIT-111 (Geographic Information Systems II)
Offered: Spring, Online


GIT-220 (3 Credits)
Database Query
Structured Query Language (SQL) is the standard for accessing data stored in relational databases. Students can become fluent in this indispensable language separately, but this class emphasizes the use of SQL to solve GIS problems by “thinking in SQL.” The strategy is to teach syntax early and then concentrate on applying SQL to solve problems. The class includes a suite of hands-on lab exercises that reinforce the concepts and technology. At the completion of the lab work, students will have worked with all the major concepts and tools of SQL and will leave the course able to use SQL to retrieve data, create queries, generate reports, and program applications.

Prerequisite: GIT-111 (Geographic Information Systems II), IT-XXX
Offered: Spring, Online
Lab fee: $125.00


GIT-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Geographical Information Technology
This course covers a variety of topics related to emerging issues and technological applications in the geographical information technology field. Course content varies each semester so this course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to interest, need, and demand.

HISTORY

HST-210 (3 Credits)
American History to 1877
This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of American history up to 1877. The course explores the major social and political themes that have shaped the nation from pre-European contact to the era known as the Reconstruction following the Civil War. The class combines traditional topics with new scholarship covering social and cultural developments that have shaped the lives of the entire spectrum of the American people. In other words, this course looks at history from the bottom up as well as from the top down. This course may be taken to satisfy the general education Humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or permission of the instructor


HST-211 (3 Credits)
American History 1877 to Present This course covers the history of the United States from the end of the Reconstruction to the present. The course combines traditional topics with new scholarship covering social and cultural developments that have shaped the lives of the entire spectrum of the American people. Sources include historical studies as well as extensive primary source documents in which the voices speak to the problems of the present. This course may be taken to satisfy the general education Humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or permission of the instructor


HST-220 (3 Credits)
History of the American Southwest
This course will consider the various nations that forged the rich, diverse heritage of today’s American Southwest. In particular, the course will explore the Southwest in history as well as in legend. Frontier conflict will be a prominent topic in the course—people against people, culture against culture, various people against the land, and the land against people, the West against the East, and the West against itself. This course may be taken to satisfy the general education Humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: C or better in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or permission of the instructor


HST-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in History
This course focuses on a variety of topics in the field of history and history-related areas. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.

HUMANITIES

HUM-160 (3 Credits)
Global Cinema
This course will focus on a variety of foreign films. Students will view films from around the world, including, but not limited to, Europe, Russia, China, Asian Pacific, New Zealand, Australia, India, Africa, and South America. The basis of the course is viewing and discussing the films, although students will also be asked to define some themes as presented in individual films as well as themes that may be present in several films. Most of the films selected revolve in some way around human interaction and/or around the cultures the films are based upon. Students will be asked to write a number of papers that may include themes, comparisons, reactions or responses to the film as a whole or to some aspect of the film that may or may not be similar to their own experiences or belief systems.


HUM-170 (3 Credits)
History of Native Americans in Media
This course is designed to allow students to examine the careers and lives of American Indians with a focus on the history of American Indians in Media. Media is a word which encompasses a broad range of topics. Students will explore issues through film, the spoken word, the written word and live performance which may be relevant to the historical significance of how American Indians are viewed. This also includes contemporary fiction/non-fiction writings, films, acting, theater performances, music and spoken word recordings; and radio and television broadcasting. In addition, the course will attempt to broaden the student’s ability to analyze and evaluate oral and written communication in terms of situation, audience, purpose, aesthetics and diverse points of view, while exploring the voices of North American Indigenous Peoples. This course may be taken to fulfill the General Education Humanities requirement.


HUM-201 (3 Credits)
Exploration of Different Cultures
This course explores various cultural world views as expressed through art, literature, music, and other forms of communication. The primary course covers humanity which becomes complete or whole with the balanced influences of the major cultures of the world. Each culture has something to offer to the others, though perhaps none have all the answers standing alone. Exploring cultures will take students on various cultures through whatever mediums available. Sharing of selections of writings, expressions, and practices will be used to help us understand different cultures.


HUM-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Humanities
Topics for this course may include art appreciation, artistic crafts, humanities, philosophy, comparative religion, music appreciation, theatre history, drama, and other related subjects. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. This course is offered according to interest, need, and demand.


HUM-305 (3 Credits)
Film History
This course explores the major film movements from 1895 to 1940, from the silent era to the advent of color film. Students will learn the fundamental forms of cinema as developed by Eisenstein and Griffith, while being introduced to the concepts of ‘mise-en scene’, montage editing, and expressionism and film noir. The work of numerous directors such as Chaplin, Murnau, Browning, Lang, Renoir, Hawks, and Ford & Capra will be explored. Students will become familiar with the history of cinema as informing and informed by culture, social history, emerging technologies and industry adaptations, and trends in visual art. Lectures and screenings are accompanied by assigned readings.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

IE-213 (3 Credits)
Structure and Properties of Materials The students will learn behavior of different engineering material under various conditions. Chemical, electrical and mechanical properties of material will be investigated.

Prerequisite: PHY-101 (Introduction to Physics)


IE-223 (3 Credits)
Designa and Manufacturing Processes I
An introductory course in manufacturing processes and systems will be covered. In addition, various manufacturing processes will be studied, including casting, forming, machining, and welding. Also, manufacturing systems such as industrial robotics and fundamentals of production lines will be covered. Students will develop hands-on skills through team projects.

Prerequisite: IE-213 (Structure and Properties of Materials)


IE-235 (3 Credits)
Lean Production This course will introduce the student to variations of the Toyota Production System as it is used in industry and business to improve efficiency and to build a problem solving culture in an organization. Topics will include: 5S, Value Stream Mapping, SMED, Kanban, Takt Time, Process at A glance and organizational culture change. Course will also compare other manufacturing philosophies and systems for manufacturing and production.


IE-243 (3 Credits)
Strength of Materials
Stresses and stress, strain energy, elastic and plastic deformation will be discussed. The student will be able to understand how the strength of materials affects all industrial engineering applications.

Prerequisite: IE-213 (Structure and Properties of Materials


IE-312 (3 Credits)
Summer Internship
Students will work part-time to full-time in a manufacturing related industry. The internship must be approved by the instructor and students will be required to prepare oral presentations to appropriate classes as assigned by the instructor.


IE-323 (3 Credits)
Human Factors in Product Design
Students will learn physical and psychological factors which affect human performance in system design. In addition, course material will cover performance as applied to safety, reliability, productivity, stress reduction. The human/equipment interface design will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: ENGR-234 (Inferential Engineering Statistics)


IE-343 (3 Credits)
Design and Manufacturing Processes II
This course will cover machining, process planning, blueprint reading, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, and measuring instruments. The students will develop hands-on learning in team projects.

Prerequisite: IE-223 (Design and Manufacturing Processes I)


IE-363 (3 Credits)
Design of Experiment
Analysis of variance for different types of factorial designs (single factor, nested, and random factors) will be discussed. Also, different factors during design of experiment, i.e., dependent, independent, and control variables will be explored.

Prerequisite: ENGR-234 (Inferential Engineering Statistics)


IE-380 (3 Credits)
Project Management
This course examines the organization, planning, and controlling of projects and provides practical knowledge on managing project scope, schedule and resources. Topics include project life cycle, work breakdown structure and Gantt charts, network diagrams, scheduling techniques, and resource allocation decisions. Concepts are applied through team projects and tutorials using project management software.

Prerequisite: Junior status


IE-413 (3 Credits)
Quality Control
This course covers digital inspection utilizing computer-aided verification. Geometric dimensioning and tolerance control and basic size inspection will also be covered along with surface inspection and the basics of quality control.

Prerequisite: IE-363 (Design of Experiment


IE-453 (3 Credits)
Engineering Optimization
In this course data mining techniques and applications of operations research applied to financial engineering, site selection, and transportation will be learned.

Prerequisite: ENGR-234 (Inferential Engineering Statistics) & MTH-163 (CalculusII)


IE-463 (3 Credits)
Facility Planning & Material Handling
Students will be able to learn how to plan a facility, location, layout models, design, analysis, supply chain relationships, and improvement of warehousing operations. Students will also study how to handle materials within the context of planning and implementation of processes.

Prerequisite: ENGR-313 (Engineering Economics)


IE-424 (4 Credits)
Capstone
The capstone course will provide the students an opportunity to utilize the skills gained from the previous semesters. Students will begin a semester project containing several elements of industrial engineering and manufacturing, including project management, 3-D modeling, and computer simulation. The will contain the research and planning of the project along with a project proposal complete with deliverables. Students will provide a project report, a final presentation and deliverables agreed upon in the project proposal.

Prerequisite: IE-223 (Design and Manufacturing Processes I) & IE-343 (Design and Manufacturing Processes II)


IE-433 (3 Credits)
Metrology and Instrumentation
Students will learn different types of measurement techniques, including laser scanning for computer-aided manufacturing and inspection, optical instruments, temperature, pressure, and force measurements. Medium to long range scanners and close range high quality scanners will be used in the course. Students will gain hands-on experience in capturing digital data, registering scan, and processing scans.

Prerequisite: IE-223 (Design and Manufacturing Processes I)


IE-473 (3 Credits)
Inventory Control & Production Planning
In this course, manufacturing support systems and production planning are discussed. Different approaches to the planning of material and capacity as well as the differences between push system and pull systems and theory of constraint will be explored.

Prerequisite: ENGR-313 (Engineering Economics


IE-483 (3 Credits)
Rapid Prototyping
Different methods of rapid prototyping processes used in product design will be introduced. The operating principles and characteristics of current and developing rapid prototyping processes will be discussed.

Prerequisite: IE-223 (Design and Manufacturing Processes I)


IE-484 (3 Credits)
Computer Aided Manufacturing & Robotics
This course will introduce the use of computers as a tool to aid in manufacturing, distribution and service environments with computer numerically controlled machines, automated storage systems and robotics.

Prerequisites: CMP-101 (Introduction to Computers) & IE-234


IE-494 (3 Credits)
Computer Simulation for Industrial Engineering
Engineering This course will introduce the use of computer simulation as a tool to create models of proposed physical systems for manufacturing or service environments to evaluate concepts and designs previous to their implementation. Students will learn to use one of the premier software packages to be able to create, evaluate and take descriptive statistics for use in assessing preliminary designs and to give feedback on projects.

Prerequisite: ENGR-234

INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS

IMO-101 (5 Credits)
Industrial Maintenance I
This course involves developing knowledge of fundamental skills of a certified industrial maintenance mechanic. Modules covered are Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) safety, construction math, introductory basic hand tools, basic power tools, basic construction drawings, basic rigging, communication skills, basic employability skills, and basic material handling.


IMO-102 (5 Credits)
Industrial Maintenance II
The course involves developing a knowledge-based of fundamental skills required of certified industrial mechanics. Modules will include: orientation of trade, tools of the trade, fasteners and anchors, oxyfuel cutting, gaskets and packets, math, construction drawings, pumps and valves, test instruments, rigging, mobile and support equipment, and lubrication. Lab will be scheduled weekly to emphasize and anchor the course material.

INTEGRATED SCIENCE

IS-090 (4 Credits)
Integrated Science
This course is designed for students who have taken inadequate, or no previous high school level science courses. The course will provide the needed background to gain clear understanding of the biological or chemical processes for University level courses. Specific simple science themes to be covered include, Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, the Chemistry of Life (Biochemistry), Cell Organization and Basic Physics. Inorganic chemistry topics to be covered are Atomic structure, chemicals and symbols, atoms and molecules, ionization, liquid mixtures, diffusion and osmosis, and chemistry of nerve cell propagation. Topics to be covered in organic chemistry will include covalent bond, polar and non-polar covalent bonds, and functional groups in organic compounds, hydrogen bonds, and isomers. Topics in biochemistry would include, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleotides, enzymes, methyl groups, biological oxidation, photosynthesis, and oxygen-carbon dioxide transport in blood. Topics to be covered in basic physics include, introductory mechanics and properties of matter, heat, light, sound waves, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear energy.

This course has no Prerequisites and laboratory sessions

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

IT-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Technology
This course introduces the students to the major ideas contained within computer science, digital manufacturing, and new media disciplines. These three areas encompass many of the practical application disciplines available to those who want to eventually work in an Information Technology related job. It is also an introduction to the Information Technology curriculum at the college and is designed to help students make intelligent decisions related to pursuing their eventual Information Technology career.


IT-103 (3 Credits)
Creativity and Technology
Creativity is the ability to take disparate experiences, emotions, knowledge gained from reading or discussion, conversations, information, and visual stimuli to create a new synthesis. Often called “out of the box thinking,” creativity allows a high level of problem analysis and problem solving. It often demands that people get out of where they are comfortable and free up their thought and emotional processes to see what they are examining in a new, “creative” way. It also leads to the creation of new products and processes that create value for organizations or businesses that drive the business forward. Learning about, and becoming good at creative processes, is especially important to economic development for poor communities. Those who are creative often face opposition, so part of becoming a creative thinker is learning how to understand why people oppose creative ideas and come up with strategies to deal with oppositional thinking and behavior both intellectually and emotionally.


IT-105 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Programming
This course will introduce students to the basics of programming concepts and techniques. Students will be introduced to the logic of design in programming and fundamentals of working with data types, conditional statements, loops, and simple algorithms. The Processing programming language will be used to introduce students to the concepts behind the Java programming language through structured code to create and manipulate graphical objects and animations.


IT-110 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Digital Logic/Hardware Programming
This course will introduce students to the knowledge base necessary for a deep understanding of how computers work from the transistor level to abstract programming to accomplish tasks and solve problems. Fundamental understanding of how information is stored and manipulated at the bit level will be explored within the context of what is necessary to be successful in crafting solutions as a programmer. Boolean algebra and number systems relevant to computing will be introduced and mastered as it pertains to digital logic design and hardware programming. Software Defined Hardware and Open Source hardware will be introduced and projects will be completed demonstrating the ability to apply what is learned from the content of the course.


IT-111 (3 Credits)
Human Computer Interaction
Ubiquitous and rich sensor-filled environments are finding their way out of the laboratory and into our workplaces and homes. Networked societies where personal computing devices for mobile phones to smartcards filler pockets and electronic devices surround us at home and work. The Web has grown from a largely academic network into the Hubble business and everyday lives. As the distinctions between the physical and the digital and between work and leisure start to break down, human-computer interaction is also changing radically. This course introduces students to HCI interaction design, and usability or interactive systems design. Students will be introduced to the foundations, design process, and models and theories of HCI.


IT-115 (3 Credits)
Drawing and Visual Culture
This course is will introduce students to the fundamental principles of visual representation and design. Students will develop familiarity with definitive works in the visual canon and important movements that have changed visual representation throughout history. Additionally, students will be asked to make subjective and objective evaluations of visual work.


IT-125 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Digital Video
In this class students are introduced to the technical and aesthetic issues surrounding the moving image. The topics introduced in this class include optics, exposure, framing, lenses, resolution, compression, transfer, editing, audio production, pacing, documentary, and the film canon. Students are required to produce a brief documentary style project at the end of the semester. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to apply the Diné Philosophy of Learning to the course material.


IT-142 (3 Credits)
Web Design Concepts
This course provides a thorough and practical guide to creating professional web sites and web pages. Students will acquire the skills necessary to create multi-column CSS layouts with optimized graphic files. Topics covered include simple XHTML, DTDs, CSS, optimizing web graphics, site development, hosting, domain names, and FTP.


IT-150 (3 Credits)
Introduction to System Administration
This course exposes students to the best practices of system and network administration, independent of specific platforms or technologies. Students will learn six key principles of site design and support practices: simplicity, clarity, generality, automation, the mutation, and basics. This course examines the major areas of responsibility for system administrators within the context of these principles. Students will also be introduced to change management and revision control, server-upgrades, maintenance windows, and service conversions.


IT-160 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Digital Ethics
Ethics is important to any professional field. In Digital Ethics a number of issues are important. These include ethics related to the developers/customers relationship, the importance of “non-compete” agreements in commercial settings, maintaining standards, maintaining integrity in the development of computer programs and the management of network systems, protecting individual privacy for users of the Internet, designing and implementing firewalls and security measures to protect user information, respect for trademarks and copyrights, maintaining professional relationships with clients, co-workers, or users of systems the technician/developer/designer develops, maintains, or implements, and developing habits of professional behavior such as follow-up, honesty, openness, communication of challenges, and respect for others.


IT-200 (3 Credits)
Sound Design
The prerequisite for this class is the completion of all general studies math requirements. This class is designed to introduce students to the audio production work flow. Topics covered include the fundamentals of acoustics, digital audio representation, microphones, DAWs, mixing, synthesis, and recording. Students are required to produce an audio project by the end of the semester that could take the form of a podcast, remix, radio play, original composition, or soundtrack. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to apply the Diné Philosophy of Learning to the course material.


IT-215 (3 Credits)
Motion Graphics
This class is designed to introduce students to the technical and aesthetic challenges of creating two dimensional animations. Students are introduced to the history of animation, raster graphics, vector graphics, tweening, filters, lower-thirds, title sequences, and text animation. Students are required to produce a short (1-2 minute) two dimensional animation project by the end of the semester


IT-218 (3 Credits)
Algorithms & Data Structures
This course introduces the fundamentals of algorithm function and design for sorting and order statistics and advanced design and analysis techniques. Data structure discussion will include elementary structures, hash tables, binary search and red-black trees, Fibonacci Heaps, and disjoint sets. Selected topics will include multithreaded algorithms, matrix operations, linear programming, string matching, computational geometry, NP-completeness, and approximation.

Prerequisite: IT-105 (Introduction to System Administration)


IT-220 (3 Credits)
Database Design
This course exposes students to basic, platform-independent principles of relational database design. Students will apply common-sense design methodology for developing databases that work. Students will also learn the fundamental principles and syntax of structured query language (SQL).


IT-222 (3 Credits)
Computer Security
This course introduces the essentials of computer and network security and covers of all the objectives for CompTIA'a Security+ certification program. Best practices, roles, and responsibilities of security practitioners are covered. Defensive measures are also introduced to protect computer systems and networks from attacks.


IT-225 (3 Credits)
Digital Video II
"Introduction to Digital Video" is a prerequisite for this class. Digital Video II introduces students who already have basic camera competency to the technical and aesthetic challenges of narrative film making. The topics introduced in this class include set design, sound design, cinematography, advanced camera techniques, jibs, steadicams, chromakey, story boarding, script writing, directing, lighting, and scheduling. Each student is required to produce a short narrative project and crew on other student projects. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to apply the Diné Philosophy of Learning to the course material.


IT-260 (3 Credits)
Internetworking
This course introduces students to TCP/IP protocols, Internet architecture, and current networking technologies. Topics to be covered include layering and packet formats for all the Internet protocols, including TCP, IPv4, IPv6, DHCP, and DNS. Other areas of interest will be covered such as new trends in Internet systems, including packet classification, Software Defined Networking (SDN), and mesh protocols.

Prerequisite: IT-105 (Introduction to Programming)


IT-270 (3 Credits)
Web Standards
This course provides a thorough and practical guide to applying web standards enforced by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Students will be exposed to standards that will allow content to be more compatible with multiple different viewing devices such as screen readers, cell phones, PDFs, HTML, XML, and CSS.

Prerequisite: IT-142 (Web Design Concepts)


IT-275 (3 Credits)
Media Criticism
Radio, TV, Film, Internet have become the main channels of education, information and entertainment for today. This course presents an introduction into understanding and ‘reading’ Media. In the class you develop intelligent perception of Media, and look at the History, Present and Future of Mass Media. You learn about the slogan ‘The Medium is the message’ and its meaning, and develop a professional approach in dealing with Media.


IT-280 (3 Credits)
Project Management
This course examines the organization, planning, and controlling of projects and provides practical knowledge on managing project scope, scheduling and managing resources. Topics include project life cycle, work breakdown structure and Gantt charts, network diagrams, scheduling techniques, and resource allocation decisions. Concepts are applied through team projects and tutorials using project management software.


IT-315 (3 Credits)
Multicore Programming
Multiprocessor Machines, or Multicores, as they are known in the industry, are quickly taking over every aspect of computing. The art of programming these systems, currently mastered by few, requires ad understanding of new computational principles, algorithms, and programming tools. This course seeks to introduce students to the tricks of the trade by providing a comprehensive presentation of the guiding principles ad algorithmic techniques necessary for effective multiprocessor programming.


IT-332 (3 Credits)
Network Security
This course provides a thorough and practical guide to network security through understanding your attacker in depth. System threats are covered including reverse engineering, SQL attacks, social engineering, anti- forensics, and other advanced attacks against UNIX and Windows systems. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the skill of reverse engineering to understand malware, trojaned binaries, spyware, and SQL injection.

Prerequisite: IT-222 (Computer Security)


IT-335 (3 Credits)
Data Visualization
This course is designed to introduce students to data visualization. Developing the skills to clearly and concisely visualize that data will be an invaluable tool in the future. Students will work with a variety of different visualization tools to produce static and dynamic visualizations. Students will analyze a variety of visualizations to determine what make certain methods effective, and what detracts from the clear and concise communication of information. The students work will them be collected in a multimedia web portfolio.


IT-345 (3 Credits)
Editing Concepts
This course introduces students to the rules of editing through the use of non-linear editing systems. Students will learn about rhythms, screen direction, and continuity. Students will also learn about the key movements and concepts in the history of editing films, from Edwin S. Porter, to Segei Eisenstein to Hitchcock and contemporary editors. Students will speak the language of editing, apply the elements of editing to tell a story, explore and use sound track, and become proficient in the fundamentals of industry standard editing platforms.

Prerequisite: IT-225 (Digital Video II)


IT-350 (3 Credits)
Programming Interactivity
This class is designed to expose students to non-linear media design. Topics covered include Flash, action- script, Max/MSP, Quartz composer, Open Frameworks, and micro-controllers. Students are required to produce an original interactive media project by the end of the semester.


IT-375 (3 Credits)
Javascript Core Skills
This course exposes students to the Document Object Model (DOM) and how to use JavaScript to add dynamic effects and manipulate the structure of the document on the fly. Students will use JavaScript and the DOM to enhance web pages with client-side dynamic effects and create markup on the fly. Some topics to be covered include: application of dynamic behavior to web pages without inserting JavaScript; writing scripts that degrade gracefully when JavaScript isn't available; using web standards to ensure cross -browser compatibility; harnessing the power of the DOM to create user-controlled animation; and using Ajax.

Prerequisite: IT-270 (Web Standards)


IT-435A (3 Credits) & IT-435B (3 Credits)
HPC/Parallel Computing
This senior level course pair will bring together the knowledge and skill sets obtained in the program to determine how parallel computer environments can be successfully applied to large-scale scientific computations. Students will successfully implement clusters of multicore/manycore machines to solve specific problems. Intelligent workload management systems will be explored and applied to automate the scheduling, managing, monitoring, and reporting of HPC workloads on massive scale, multi-technology installations.

Prerequisite: IT-315 (Multicore Programming)


IT-415 (3 Credits)
Audio Project
The audio project is designed for students who have completed audio production. The student must create a pitch for their audio project at the beginning of the semester, and then, in close contact with their program advisor, spend remaining time writing, directing, recording, editing, and showing a work that demonstrates mastery of the technical and aesthetic challenges of audio production. Acceptable final project are musical recordings, net casts, or sound design for film.


IT-420 (3 Credits)
Advanced CSS
This course provides content to take the three main web standards, XHTML for data structure, JavaScript for dynamic effects, and Cascading Style Sheets for styling of data, and tie them together using advanced CSS techniques to allow the student to craft modern, standards-compliant web page designs. Students will learn good working practices, the cascade, the box model, relative and absolute positioning, and floating. Advanced techniques will be applied to overcoming browser quirks and hacking and filtering.

Prerequisite: IT-375 (Javascript Core Skills)


IT-440A (3 Credits) & B (3 Credits)
Advanced Technology Security
This senior level course pair will bring together the knowledge and skill sets obtained in the program to apply computer and network security tools and environments to allow the deep analysis of compromised systems and test live environments for existing weaknesses and mitigate any potential loss of information those weaknesses may cause.

Prerequisite: IT-332 (Network Security)


IT-445 (4 Credits)
3D Modeling/Animation
In this class students are introduced to the technical and aesthetic challenges of creating three dimensional animation. Topics covered include 3-D modeling, texturing, openGL, augmented reality, and 3-D environment design. Students who are interested in learning the fundamentals of basic computer geometry, will look at the basic elements that make up the 3D models. Students will be introduced to a couple of application programs that are used in today’s 3D modeling environment. Students will have hands on training in creating, lighting, editing and mapping of materials for the 3D models. Modeling projects will be planned, designed and produced. Students will be encouraged to work as a team. Students are required to produce a short (1-2 minute) 3-D animation project by the end of the semester.

Prerequisite: IT-215 (Motion Graphics)


IT-450 (3 Credits)
Interactive Project
The interactive project is designed for students who have completed Programming Interactivity. The student must create a pitch for their interactive project at the beginning of the semester, and then, in close contact with their program advisor, spend remaining time constructing, designing, and showing a work that demonstrates mastery of the technical and aesthetic challenges of interactive design. Acceptable final project are highly interactive website, programs, or installations.

Prerequisite: IT-350 (Programing Interactivity


IT-472A (3 Credits) & IT-472B (3 Credits)
Web App Development
This senior level course pair will bring together the knowledge and skill sets obtained in the program to apply HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to create and deploy web applications. Topics will include creating a user interface, writing a server, building client-server communication and using a cloud-based service to deploy applications.


IT-480 (3 Credits)
Aural and Optical Perception
The prerequisites for this class are completion of all general studies science and math requirements. This class is designed to introduce students to the aural and optical perception systems in the human body. Students learn the basic anatomy of the eye, ear, and how each communicates with the brain. An emphasis will be placed on the phenomena in perception that impact media design. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to apply the Diné Philosophy of Learning to the course material.


IT-485A (3 Credits) & IT-485B (3 Credits)
Advanced Technology Administration
This senior level course pair will bring together the knowledge and skill sets obtained in the program to apply virtualization solutions, including networking, storage, servers, operating systems, application optimization, security and clustering. Interoperable design tools will be used to implement highly-efficient architectures for new, expanded, or retrofit datacenter projects.

Prerequisite: IT-405 (Cluster Maintenance Management)


IT-490A (3 Credits) & IT-409B (3 Credits)
Senior Project
The senior project is designed for students in their senior year who have already demonstrated competency in video, audio, and animation. The student must create a pitch for their senior project at the beginning of the year, and then, in close contact with their program advisor, spend two semesters writing, directing, shooting, editing, and showing a work that demonstrates mastery of the technical and aesthetic challenges of media production.


IT-195/295/395/495 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Information Technology
This course examines a variety of topics, trends, and emerging technologies of contemporary interest to those in information technology or related fields. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. Typically, the course that is offered under this heading is an elective and is offered according to interest, need, and demand.


IT-107 (3 Credits)
Internet Research
This is a hands-on first course in the use of the Internet and webpage design using HTML. Areas of study will include email, FTP and other Internet tasks such as research techniques, HTML, etiquette, and ethics. This course is an introduction to using the Internet effectively for research. Student will learn how perform basic and complex Internet searches, use search engines and subject guides effectively, evaluate and cite online resources, and utilize specialized research tools, including newsgroups and intelligent search agents.


IT-120 (3 Credits)
Microsoft Office Suite
This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience related to the personal computer and its uses in society. Application programs from the Microsoft Office Suite will be taught including Word, Excel, Outlook, Access and PowerPoint. This course is designed to provide students with a general introduction to word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software. Students will be completing many hands- on assignments and activities using a personal computer in a supportive lab setting.

Prerequisite: CMP-101 (Introduction to Computers) or permission of the instructor


IT-195/295 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Information Technology
This course examines a variety of topics, trends, and emerging technologies of contemporary interest to those in information technology or related fields. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. Typically, the course that is offered under this heading is an elective and is offered according to interest, need, and demand.


ITS-415 (3 Credits)
Directing and Producing
The producer’s job is to evaluate a story, secure the rights and pitch the story to secure financing. Students will learn this process: evaluate and improve a story, pitch the story, schedule the project, develop a basic budget and discuss and solve problems during production, or class projects. They will learn the producer's role in the six phases of the film manufacturing process. The course will also examine the role of the director in relation to critical, creative areas of motion picture production. Students will work in digital video format to practice their skills.

MAINTENANCE ENGINEERING

ME-345 (3 Credits)
Statics
This course will introduce students to the science of statics. During the course students will learn how to determine the relationships between forces acting on rigid bodies at rest. Areas covered will be scalar and vector quantities, resultants, analysis of structures, friction, centroids and center of gravity.


ME-353 (3 Credits)
Fluid Mechanics
Topics include: Fluid properties, turbulent and laminar flow, gas dynamics.

Prerequisite: PHY-111 & MTH-163


ME-354 (3 Credits)
Thermodynamics
Topics include: Laws of Thermodynamics, Phases of substances, Processes and cycles, Work and heat, Control Volumes, Entropy and Enthalpy.


MATHEMATICS

MTH-098 (3 Credits)
Technical Mathematics I
This course will cover basic concepts in arithmetic such as whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent, ratio, proportion, measurement, pre-algebra, pre-statistics, probability, and pre-geometry. Course will be applied to real and relevant fields of studies which includes Navajo culture and Diné Philosophy of Education and mathematics pertaining to students’ major.


MTH-105 (3 Credits)
Mathematics for Engineering Applications
This course will provide an overview of the salient math topics most heavily used in the core sophomore-level engineering courses. These include algebraic manipulation of engineering equations, trigonometry, vectors and complex numbers, sinusoids and harmonic signals, systems of equations and matrices, differentiation, integration and differential equations. All math topics will be presented within the context of an engineering application, and reinforced through extensive examples of their use in the core engineering courses.


MTH-113 (3 Credits)
Technical Mathematics II
This course will cover the application of arithmetic, measurement, introduction to algebra, equations and formulas, ratio and proportion, geometry, right triangle trigonometry, Law of Sines, and basic statistics. The Navajo cultural ways of learning and knowing are integrated as well.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-098 (Technical Mathematics I) or satisfactory placement scores


MTH-115 (3 Credits)
Introductory Algebra
Introductory Algebra will cover lessons pertaining to Real Number System, Expressions, Solving Equations and Inequalities, Polynomials, and Factoring. Course will be applied to real and relevant fields of studies which includes Navajo culture and Diné Philosophy of Education and mathematics pertaining to students’ major.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MTH-113 (Technical Mathematics II) or satisfactory placement scores


MTH-118 (3 Credits)
Pre-Algebra
Introductory Algebra will cover lessons pertaining to Real Number System, Expressions, Solving Equations, Polynomials, Factoring, Rational Expressions/Equations, Functions/Graphs/Applications, and Systems of Equations, More on Inequalities, Radical Expressions / Equations / Functions, and Quadratic Equations/Functions. The course will be integrated to other fields of study to make it real and relevant. At times, the learning process relating to the Navajo culture in the areas of Nitsahakees, Nahatah, Iina, and Sihasin will be covered as well as other cultures (multi-cultural studies).

Prerequisite: A grade of "B" or better in MTH-113 (Technical Mathematics II)


MTH-120 (4 Credits)
Intermediate Algebra
Topics included in this course include linear equations and inequalities, functions-concepts and graphing, systems of equations, polynomial functions, factoring, rational and radical expressions, equations and functions, and quadratic equations and functions. This course involves four hours of lecture per week and it is essential that students have a command of basic algebraic skills such as factoring and basic equation- solving before enrolling.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-115 (Introductory to Algebra) or satisfactory placement scores


MTH-121 (4 Credits)
College Algebra
In this course, topics covered include linear equations and inequalities, linear modeling, functions-concepts and graphing, quadratic functions and models, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and sequences and series. The course involves four hours of lecture per week and students must have a command of basic algebraic skills such as factoring, basic equation-solving, and a thorough knowledge of the rules of exponents and radicals.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra) or satisfactory placement scores


MTH-123 (4 Credits)
Trigonometry
Topics include trigonometric functions, radian and degree measure, graphs, basic trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, Law of Sines and Cosines, and practical applications of right triangles.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MTH-121 (College Algebra) or satisfactory placement scores


MTH-131 (5 Credits)
College Algebra & Trigonometry
This course is designed primarily to facilitate students in STEM programs complete their basic mathematics requirement. College algebra and Trigonometry is a comprehensive course that deals with the rigor of basic collegiate math that includes topics such as (1) Quadratic function’s models, graphs, equations, and applications (2) Polynomial and rational functions. (3) Sequences and series, (4) Combinatory Mathematics: Permutation, Combination, Probability, (5) Matrix Algebra, (6) angle Measure, (7) Trigonometric Functions and applications, (8) Unit Circle (9) Trigonometric Identities, (10) Right Triangle Trigonometry, and (11) Laws of sine and Cosine.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra) or satisfactory placement score


MTH-150 (4 Credits)
Pre-Calculus
This course includes topics such as modeling with functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic trigonometric identities, practical applications with right triangles, graphs, inverse trigonometric functions, and Laws of Sines and Cosines, and sequence and series. The course involves four hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra) or satisfactory placement score


MTH-162 (4 Credits)
Calculus I
This course is designed to develop the analytical ability of students through (1) modeling functions and calculation of its limit, (2) defining and solving derivatives of functions, (3) solving equations of tangent and normal lines, (4) implicit differentiation, (5) chain rule, (6) related rates and optimizations, (7) fundamental theorem of Calculus, (8) volumes of solids of revolution. At times, the learning process relating to the Navajo Culture in the areas of Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Sihasin will be covered as well as other cultures (multi-cultural studies).

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-123 or an equivalent course or satisfactory placement score


MTH-163 4 Credits)
Calculus II
This course covers topics such as applications of integration, area between curves, volumes, techniques of integration, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, further applications of integration, arc length, area of a surface of revolutions, parametric equations and polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, comparison tests, ratio tests, root tests, and power series. The course involves four hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-162 or an equivalent course or satisfactory placement score


MTH-205 (3 Credits)
Discrete Mathematics
This course is a survey of elementary logic and set theory, functions, direct proof techniques, contradiction and contraposition, mathematical induction and recursion, elementary combinatorics, basic graph theory and minimal spanning trees.

Prerequisite: EE-103 (Digital Logic Design)


MTH-213 (3 Credits)
Elementary Statistics
The topics of study for this course include describing, exploring, and comparing data, probability, addition rules, multiplication rules, complements and conditional probability, probability distributions, binomial probability distributions, the Poisson distribution, normal probability distributions, the central limit theorem, estimates of population mean and variance, hypothesis testing, inferences from two samples, and correlation and regression.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra) or an equivalent course


MTH-264 (4 Credits)
Calculus III
This course is designed to develop the analytical ability of students through the study of (1) partial derivatives, (2) dot products and cross products, (3) vectors, (4) LaGrange multipliers, (5) double integrals, (6) triple integrals in rectangular coordinates, (7) triple integrals in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, (8) line integrals, (9) divergence theorems. At times, the learning process relating to the Navajo Culture in the areas of Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina and Sihas in will be covered as well as other cultures (multi-cultural studies).

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MTH-162 or an equivalent course or satisfactory placement score


MTH-306 (3 Credits)
College Geometry
An axiomatic approach to fundamentals of Geometry both Euclidean and no-Euclidean. Emphasis on historical development. College Geometry also presents a formal and fundamental development of neutral and Euclidean geometry with an emphasis on valid arguments. Non-Euclidean geometry will also be investigated. The course begins with a thorough review of geometry, including using synthetic and algebraic approaches, and continues with a selection of more advanced topics. Topics covered include two- and three-dimensional shapes, proving triangles congruent or similar, quadrilaterals, circles, plane geometry and non-Euclidean geometry.


MTH-310 (4 Credits)
Differential Equations
The theory of partial differential equations will be developed. Also, special emphasis will be placed on techniques of solutions and boundary problems.

Prerequisite: MTH-163 (Calculus II)


MTH-410 (3 Credits)
Linear Algebra
The course covers a study of matrices, vectors on a plane, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. The class will use technology device such as graphing calculator to aid in computations. Furthermore, they will be trained to be independent learners through both independent practices as well as cooperative learning.


MTH-433 (3 Credits)
Numerical Analysis with Computers
Introductory concepts and calculus, errors, root finding for nonlinear equations, interpolation and approximation theory, numerical integration and differentiation, linear algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors will be discussed.

Prerequisite: MTH-163 (Calculus II) & MTH-310 (Differential Equations

PRE-NURSING

NRS-101 (5 Credits)
Nurse Assisting Theory and Lab
This course prepares the student to perform nursing assistant skills required for the care and comfort of individuals in various health care settings. Pre-requisite: demonstration of 8th grade reading ability.

Lab fee: $125.00


NRS-102 (1 Credit)
Nurse Assisting Internship
This course provides the practical experience for nursing assistant students. Students will apply the nursing assistant skills learned in the nursing assistant theory and lab course in the care and comfort of individuals in various health care settings. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Co-requisite: NRS-101 Nurse Assisting Theory and Lab


NRS-103 (3 Credits)
Basic Medical Technology
This course presents basic concepts of medical terminology. A general overview of work elements that make up medical terminology will be examined. Common medical terminology will be presented. Opportunities will be given for students to learn correct pronunciation and spelling as they define the medical terms assigned.


NRS-110 (4 Credits)
Body Structure and Functions
This course provides students with an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It is intended as a first course that will provide a foundation for more complex clinical discussions and more advanced anatomy and physiology courses. This course may be offered as either an online course or in the classroom or it may be offered using a combination of both teaching methods.

The course delivery method is determined by the instructor and may vary from semester to semester

NRS-115 (2 Credits)
Technical Math for Health Profession
This course provides a review of practical mathematics required for accurate and safe medication administration. The content is arranged for a progression of basic to more complex information. Students will be assisted to learn and understand their individual strengths and weaknesses in math and build on this information. Practice is given in dosage calculations across the lifespan, skills required for accurate oral and injectable drug dosage calculations, and reading and interpreting drug orders and labeling. Introductory information is given for intravenous therapy.


NRS-195 (1-6 Credits)
Topics in Nursing
This course explores a variety of topics related to emerging concerns, technologies, and areas of skill development pertinent to the nursing and health-related fields. Course content varies each semester and the course is offered according to interest, need, and demand.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

PAD-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Public Administration
This is an Introductory to Public Administration. It will provide an overview of numerous factors that affect public administration, and study the theories and issues relating to it. This course will cover also important areas including; federalism, contexts of administration, organization theory, organization behavior, management, leadership, labor relations, public personnel management, budgeting, decision making, bureaucracy, and ethics and accountability. This course will also tackle public administration in different countries that will enhance students' understanding of public administration systems. Current cases related to public administration will be incorporated so that students can use critical thinking to analyze issues and apply public administration theories.


PAD-110 (3 Credits)
Public Finance Administration
This course focus on administrative activities associated with the handling of public monies for all kinds of public organizations, including non-profit organizations and entities of the local, state and federal levels of government. Administrative activities of concern here are the less visible day to day planning of public monies and related technical support activities rather than the more visible political activities associated with public budgeting.


PAD-210 (3 Credits)
Public Sector Management
This course provides an overview of the key issues to be addressed and explain on public administration. It will also describe the political actors and institutions external to a government agency that help determine the success or failure of that agency in accomplishing its mission. It will also give an opportunity for student to examine the strategies and structures that government agencies adopt to operate effectively and efficiently in their environments. Public sector management also broadened student knowledge on government systems designed for managing human, fiscal and information resources. This course also recognizes the importance of student developing basic management skills such as communication, motivation, teamwork and group dynamics, decision making, power, influence, and leadership. The course will employ variety of cases, exercises, and simulation to give students some sense of real-world implications of their actions, learn from one’s experience, reflection and insights.


PAD-225 (3 Credits)
Human Behavior in Organization
This course studies the underlying reasons why people act the way they do and help them evaluate the strength and deficit in their biological, psychological, and social development. A variety of theories and research about human growth and development both internal and external variables that influence human behavior in an organization will also be covered.


PAD-230 (3 Credits)
Internship/Practicum
In the internship portion of this program students will work a minimum of 150 hours at any government agencies like Navajo Nation work related to Public Administration.


PAD-295 (3 Credits)
Topics in Public Administration
This course examines a variety of topics related Public Administration. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to interest, need, and demand.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PED-101 (1 Credit)
Physical Education
This course offers seasonal physical activities during each semester for men and women to promote healthy living and fitness throughout life.


PED-120 (1 Credit)
Strength Training
Introductory activities in strength training individualized programming safety, fitness, benefits, and exercise selection. One hour lab required.


PED-130 (2 Credits)
Jogging
This is an introductory activities in the proper running techniques, program design, pacing, form running, interval training, and distance running. One hour lab required.


PED-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Physical Education
This course focuses on a variety of areas in physical education, wellness, exercise, and fitness. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. This course is offered based on need, interest, and demand.

PHYSICS

PHY-101 (4 Credits)
Introduction to Physics
This course fulfills the general education science requirement for students seeking an associate degree. The contents of the course include measurement, gravitational motion, Newton’s Laws, rational mechanics, momentum energy, power, temperature, heat, sound, optical wave, electrostatics, and electricity. Lab included.

Lab fee: $125.00


PHY-111 (4 Credits)
Algebra-Based Physics I
This course is the first in a two-semester introduction to algebra-based physics. The broad topics covered in the course include mechanics, vibrations, and wave motion. More specifically, the topics covered involve one- and two-dimensional motion, vectors, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion, rotational equilibrium and dynamics, solids and fluids, vibration and waves, and sound. Mathematical techniques used in the course include algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, but not calculus. Class meetings will be devoted to lecture, discussion, problem-solving, and discovery labs. There will be three hours of discovery lab each week.

Prerequisite: MTH-120 (Intermediate Algebra) or permission of the instructor. This course is only offered in the fall semester.
Lab fee: $125.00


PHY-112 (4 Credits)
Algebra-Based Physics II
This course is a continuation of the study of physics begun in PHY-111. The course of study continues with conceptual foundations in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. In addition, students will learn problem-solving techniques in these areas. Physics 112 is the appropriate second course for students who plan no further study in physics. The course includes three hours of discovery lab per week.

Prerequisite: PHY-111 (Algebra-Based Physics I). This course is only offered in the spring semester.
Lab fee: $125.00


PHY-121 (4 Credits)
Calculus-Based Physics I
The first semester of this calculus-based two-semester introductory sequence in physics uses the workshop physics method. This approach combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with comprehensive use of computer tools. Topics covered include kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, rotational motion, and oscillations. The course includes three hours of discovery lab each week.

Prerequisite: MTH-121 (College Algebra), MTH-123 (Trigonometry), or MTH-150 (Pre-Calculus). This course is offered in the fall semester only.
Lab fee:$125.00


PHY-122 (4 Credits)
Calculus-Based Physics II
This course continues the study of physics begun in PHY-121. The approach to this course combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools. The course covers topics such as electricity, electronics, magnetism, and thermodynamics. Physics 122 is required for students who wish to further their studies in physics. The weekly three hour discovery lab requires.

Prerequisite: PHY-121 (Calculus-Based Physics I) and MTH-162 (Calculus I). This course is offered in the spring semester only.
Lab fee: $125.00

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POS-20 (3 Credits)
United States and Arizona Constitution
Examination of the United States Constitution and the constitution and government of the State of Arizona.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY-105 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Psychology
This course will be a broad look at the science of psychology today and will serve as a window into the concepts of psychology. The course will cover topics such as the nervous system, sensation and perception, sleep and dreams, types of memory, thought, and language. It will also examine how human beings develop cognitively, emotionally, and socially.


PSY-210 (3 Credits)
Developmental Psychology
This course is an introduction to the psychology of human development throughout the lifespan. Participants study theories in maturational and behavioral development throughout life stages as well as the general principles and concepts of human growth. The course meets the needs of the students who are enrolled in programs where an understanding of human development is important, such as early childhood education, preschool and elementary education, human services, counseling, and nursing.

Prerequisite: PSY-105 (Introduction to Psychology) or permission of instructor


PSY-195/295/395 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Psychology
This course examines a variety of topics related to contemporary psychology issues and practices. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered according to interest, need, and demand.

SMALL BUSINESS

SBS-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Small Business
This course covers all phases of the development and management of a small business with emphasis on small tribal businesses. The course includes such components as characteristics of an entrepreneur, the different types of businesses, customers, competition, marketing and market plans, pricing and sales planning, personal finances, analysis of financial sources, types of ownership, and regulations.


SBS-112 (3 Credits)
Small Business Marketing
This course covers marketing concepts, such as strategic planning, marketing environment and marketing ethics, market opportunities, product decisions, distribution decisions, marketing communications, and pricing decisions.


SBS-113 (3 Credits)
Navajo Ethics and Commercial Law
This course is a survey of ethics and business law as they pertain to the Navajo Nation. Topics covered are ethics, law, and the judicial system; uniform commercial code; contract law; and sales and consumer protection.


SBS-195 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Small Business Management & Development
This course covers a variety of topics in the field of small business management and development. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. This course is offered according to need, interest, and demand.


SCI-101 (4 Credits)
Physical Science
This is an introductory, survey course that covers the fundamental concepts in physics, chemistry, geology, and astronomy. A hands-on lab is included as part of this course.

Lab fee: $125.00


SCI-195/295 (1-4 Credits)
Topics in Science
This course is designed to explore emerging fields in the physical sciences and related areas of engineering and technology. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. The course is offered based upon demand, need, and interest.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC-101 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Sociology
This course covers a broad survey of the field of Sociology and the principles that sociologists use to understand the development of the human social environment. The course introduces the basic concepts and theories of sociology—culture, socialization, social groups, deviance, race, ethnicity, gender, age, family, health care, religion, and global society. This course may be taken to satisfy the general education Humanities/ Social Sciences requirement.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or an equivalent course.


SOC-210 (3 Credits)
Sociology of Social Problems
This course analyzes, from a sociological perspective, a range of problems in the contemporary U.S. and world society—racism and prejudice, poverty and inequality, changes affecting families, problems of substance abuse, global inequality, survival of indigenous peoples worldwide, violence and other areas of contemporary concern. This course may be taken to fulfill the general education Humanities/Social Sciences requirement.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in ENG-098 (Reading and Writing Skills) or an equivalent course.


SOC-195/295/395 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Sociology
This course covers a variety of topics in the field of sociology and sociology-related areas. Course content varies each semester so course may be repeated for credit with different sections numbers. This course is offered based upon interest, need, and demand.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

SSC-100 (3 Credits)
College Success Skills
This course is designed for the student first enrolling at Navajo Technical University. Its purpose is to help students make the most of their college experience by acquiring skills and information about college life and culture, instructors’ expectations, study and test-taking strategies, and managing their financial and educational future. The student will also discover helpful information that will assist those planning to transfer to a four year institution, if that is a goal for the student. The Diné Philosophy of Learning is an important component of this class.


SSC-195, 295, & 395 (1-3 Credits)
Topics in Behavioral and Social Sciences
This course covers a variety of topics in the fields of political science, anthropology, and related social science disciplines. Course content varies each semester so the course may be repeated for credit with differing section numbers. This course is offered based upon interest, need, and demand.

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

VET-090 (1 Credit)
Introduction to Veterinary Technology
This course will give veterinary technology students an overview of the veterinary technology program and an overview of a career in veterinary technology. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is offered in the fall and spring semesters only.


VET-130 (1 Credit)
Veterinary Medical Technology
This course provides students with a foundation in the language of veterinary medicine, focusing on prefixes, suffixes, word roots and their combining forms.

Prerequisites: BIO 120, CHM 120, ENG 110 or 111 or 112, MTH 121, and NAV 101 or higher. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course in only offered in the fall semester.


VET-131 (1 Credit)
Navajo Veterinary Medical Terminology
This course will provide a foundation in communicating and understanding Navajo veterinary medical terms and client communication.

Prerequisites: BIO 120, CHM 120, ENG 110 or 111 or 112, MTH 121, and NAV 101 or higher. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course in only offered in the fall semester.


VET-132 (1 Credit)
Veterinary Office Procedures
This course will provide students with experience with commonly encountered clinical procedures with an emphasis on the role of the veterinary technician in the management of veterinary patients, records, laws and ethics, and client communication. This course will also introduce students to veterinary management software.

Prerequisites: BIO 120, CHM 120, ENG 110 or 111 or 112, MTH 121, and NAV 101 or higher. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is in only offered in the fall semester.


VET-134 (6 Credits)
Veterinary Anatomy & Physiology I
This course provides background in the anatomy and physiology of animals. The course covers the structure and function of each body system, including skeletal, muscular, circulatory, integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, urogenital, reproductive, nervous, and endocrine. This course will also cover basic physiology principles, metabolism, digestion, acid-base balance, immunity, and unique characteristics of common domestic species. Applied laboratory experiences are included.

Prerequisites: BIO 120, CHM 120, ENG 110 or 111 or 112, MTH 121, and NAV 101 or higher. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course in only offered in the fall semester.


VET-136 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Nursing I
This course will cover small animal patient assessment techniques (signalment, history, and patient data), restraint, and husbandry.

Prerequisites: BIO 120, CHM 120, ENG 110 or 111 or 112, MTH 121, and NAV 101 or higher. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the


VET-140 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Surgical Nursing
This course provides familiarity with surgical instruments, surgical support equipment, and surgery room preparation.

Prerequisites: VET-130, VET-131, VET-132, VET-134, and VET-136. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-142 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Pharmacology for Technicians
This course provides background in pharmacology principles, including topics such as: mechanism of drug action, types of drugs, pharmacy management, client communication, regulations, and calculations related to drug dosages.

Prerequisites: VET-130, VET-131, VET-132, VET-134, and VET-136. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-144 (3 Credits)
Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Procedures I
This course will cover the biology, clinical appearance, laboratory handling, and laboratory diagnosis of parasitic disease and their zoonotic potential.

Prerequisites: VET-130, VET-131, VET-132, VET-134, and VET-136. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-146 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Nursing II
This course will cover small animal patient diagnostic specimen collection and therapeutic techniques.

Prerequisites: VET-130, VET-131, VET-132, VET-134, and VET-136. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-148 (2 Credits)
Animal Nutrition
This course provides a foundation in the principles of animal nutrition emphasizing the relationship between nutrition and health. The course focuses on the basic elements of nutrition including the major categories of nutrients, and their sources, digestion, and metabolism. Both large and small animal feeds and feeding will be covered.

Prerequisites: VET-130, VET-131, VET-132, VET-134, and VET-136. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-150 (1 Credit)
Veterinary Dentistry
This course will cover dental anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology, routine prophylaxis including equipment, environment, instruments, supplies, radiology, and client education.

Prerequisites: VET-130, VET-131, VET-132, VET-134, and VET-136. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-230 (3 Credits)
Veterinary Medicine and Surgery
This course will cover common medical and surgical conditions of small and large animals with the emphasis on the role of the veterinary technician in the management of these cases.

Prerequisites: VET-140, VET-142, VET-144, VET-146, and VET-148. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the fall semester.


VET-232 (3 Credits)
Veterinary Anesthesiology
This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of pre-anesthetic preparation, induction, anesthetic maintenance, post-operative care, and anesthesia monitoring for patients. The students will gain knowledge on anesthetic agents including their actions, side effects, and methods of delivery. Students will learn about anesthetic equipment, pain management, and basic life support and emergency response procedures.

Prerequisites: VET-140, VET-142, VET-144, VET-146, and VET-148. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the fall semester.


VET-234 (4 Credits)
Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Procedures II
This course will cover the biochemical parameters that characterize disease. Topics include sample collection, analysis of urine, blood, cytological samples, basic principles of anatomic pathology, and necropsy procedure.

Prerequisites: VET-140, VET-142, VET-144, VET-146, and VET-148. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the fall semester.


VET-236 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging I
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of radiology including the production of x-rays, radiation safety, diagnostic applications, equipment, darkroom procedures, the radiographic image, animal positioning and technique. An instruction to computed tomography, ultrasound, and endoscopy will be covered.

Prerequisites: VET-140, VET-142, VET-144, VET-146, and VET-148. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the fall semester.


VET-240 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging II
This course will provide hands-on experience utilizing radiographic equipment, positioning of animals for radiographs, developing a technique chart and utilizing dark room procedures.

Prerequisites: VET-230, VET-232, VET-234, VET-236, and VET-238. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-242 (2 Credits)
Avian, Exotic, Lab, Animal Husbandry and Handling
This course provides students with knowledge and skills in clinical procedures and focuses on exotic and laboratory animal husbandry, handling, restraint, and specific problems encountered with exotic and lab animals.

Prerequisites: VET-230, VET-232, VET-234, VET-236, and VET-238. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-244 (3 Credits)
Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Procedures III
This course will cover the biology, clinical appearance and laboratory diagnosis of bacterial and viral causes of veterinary disease, including zoonotic importance. Laboratory safety and maintenance of laboratory equipment will also be covered.

Prerequisites: VET-230, VET-232, VET-234, VET-236, and VET-238. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-246 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Nursing III
This course will cover large animal patient assessment techniques (signalment, history, and patient data), restraint, husbandry, patient diagnostic specimen collection, therapeutic techniques, and dental techniques.

Prerequisites: VET-230, VET-232, VET-234, VET-236, and VET-238. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered during the spring semester.


VET-248 (2 Credits)
Veterinary Critical Care
This course will provide instruction assessment, monitoring, and intervention with emergencies. The student will use knowledge of overall anatomy, physiology, disease, or injury to assist in veterinarian diagnoses and treatment.

Prerequisites: VET-230, VET-232, VET-234, VET-236, and VET-238. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-250 (1 Credit)
Veterinary Technician National Examination Review
This course will review the following topics in preparation for clinical practice and the Veterinary Technology National Exam (VTNE): Pharmacy & Pharmacology, Surgical Nursing, Dentistry, Laboratory Procedures, Animal Care and Nursing, Diagnostic Imaging, Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care, and Pain Management/Analgesia. Students will also learn test taking skills.

Prerequisites: VET-230, VET-232, VET-234, VET-236, and VET-238. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the spring semester.


VET-260 (3 Credits)
Veterinary Technology Practicum I
This 12-week course provides students with the opportunity to supplement coursework with practical work experience in a veterinary setting under the supervision of a veterinarian and experienced personnel.

Prerequisites: VET-240, VET-242, VET-244, VET-246, VET-248, and VET-250. Students must earn 75% or better to advance to the next level of courses in the major. This course is only offered in the summer semester.

WELDING

WLD-101 (3 Credits)
Welding Fundamentals
Development of basic skills in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), oxyacetylene cutting welding (OFC), and oxy-fuel welding (OFW) in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) entry level welder program will be covered.

Course fee: $35


WLD-105 (3 Credits)
Pipe Welding I / Structural Welding I

Learn to Set up and adjustment of ARC and oxyacetylene equipment. Welding safety procedures and terminology, skill development in laying weld beads with various patterns, positions, and processes will be discussed.

Course fee: $35


WLD-115 (3 Credits)
Structural Welding I
Emphasis will be placed on AWS entry and advanced level welder skills with SMAW, including all position welding wild mild and stainless steel electrodes. Plasma arc and air carbon arc cutting, metallurgy, heat treatment, and weld defects.

Prerequisite: WLD-101 (Welding Fundamentals)
Course fee: $35


WLD-120 (3 Credits)
Basic Metallurgy
Properties of ferrous and nonferrous materials will be covered in this course. Service conditions and heat treatment of metals related to welding trade will be discussed.

Prerequisite: WLD-101 (Welding Fundamentals)
Course fee: $35


WLD-125 (3 Credits)
Introduction to Pipe Welding
Pipe fit-up and welding techniques for pipefitting and pipe weld joint using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), and flux cored arc welding (FCAW), 2G welding of pipe.

Course fee: $35


WLD-130 (3 Credits)
Introduction to GMAW MIG/FCAW
Development of basic skills with gas metal arc welding (GMAW), metal inert gas (MIG), flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) in accordance with AWS entry level welder objectives. Wire electrodes, shielding/purge gases, and modes of metal transfer will be discussed.

Course fee: $35


WLD-150 (3 Credits)
Pipe Welding II / Structural Welding II
This is continuation of WLD-125 and WLD--125, with groove welded joints in a horizontal fixed and 45-degree fixed positions (5-F, 5-G, 6-F, and 6-G).

Course fee: $35

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Welcome to Navajo Technical University. Navajo Tech is committed to offering quality technical, vocational, and academic degrees, and community education in student oriented, hands-on learning environment based on the Dine Philosophy of Education. Our primary campus is located in Crownpoint, New Mexico; two Arizona instructional sites in Chinle and Teec Nos Pos are growing rapidly!